Olympic Sprint Records: Using Decimals to Understand and Predict Records

Grade Levels
5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th
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2.77 MB   |   7 pages

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Since the first modern Olympics in 1896, runners in the 100 meter sprint have been setting records on a regular basis, earning the title of the "fastest human on earth." How long can these records be broken? Will there eventually be a runner who can do the 100 meter sprint in just a few seconds? This activity shows students how the change from measuring time from tenths of a second to hundredths of a second allowed more records to be broken, and that by graphing these records, the new records can be predicted for the next 10 Olympics. This activity uses actual data from runners between 1896 and the 2012 Olympics to create a hyperbola through "curve fitting." it is an excellent activity for 5th through 9th grade.
Total Pages
7
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A

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Olympic Sprint Records: Using Decimals to Understand and P
Olympic Sprint Records: Using Decimals to Understand and P
Olympic Sprint Records: Using Decimals to Understand and P