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Partner Math Games (Monster Theme) (Printable)

Bloomabilities
5.3k Followers
Grade Levels
1st - 2nd, Homeschool
Standards
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
45 student pages
$8.00
$8.00
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Bloomabilities
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  1. Reinforce math concepts with these 34 math games that can be used throughout the year as a Do-Now upon arrival, a math workshop activity, for fast finishers, in enrichment centers, and as summer work. While these games are designed for first grade students, they can be used for High Flyers in kinder
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Description

Reinforce math concepts with these 21 math games that can be used throughout the year as a Do-Now upon arrival, a math workshop activity, for fast finishers, in enrichment centers, and as summer work. While these games are designed for first grade students, they can be used for High Flyers in kindergarten and as a Back to School review for second grade students - especially for back to school. Available in black and white and color versions, these games are designed to be easy to manage: print and play! 

About this resource

  • Each game has just ONE page to print. 
  • With the exception of Place Value Exchange Game (just one page if you supply ones, tens, flat for hundred OR print extra page and have kids cut our paper versions I provided) the only materials needed are dice, Chips/Tokens, and, for a few games, a paperclip and pencil for the spinners. That’s all! No dice to make, cards to cut...it's that easy!
  • I print out in color for partner center games and glue the game to construction paper. To save on laminating and space, I then glue another game on the back before laminating. I run the B/W version for play at home.

Please click on “View Preview” for a preview of this resource. 

Games included: 

✿Odd/Even Roll & Move

✿Monster Mash (True/False Addition Equations)

✿Monster Mash (True/False Subtraction Equations)

✿Make Ten (Combinations of Ten)

✿Number Please! (Doubles, Greater Than, Less Than, Between, Odd/Even, 10 Less/More)

✿Bump! Skip Count by 2s (Up to 24)

✿Bump! Skip Count by 2s (Up to 48)

✿Place Value Exchange Game (Ones, Tens, Hundreds)

✿Monster Munch (+10, -10, +9, -9)

✿Bump! Skip Count by 5s (up to 60)

✿Bump! Skip Count by 5s (Up to 120)

✿Balanced Equations (Doubles given and then must balance equation: 7+7=8+?)

✿Monster Mayhem (Add and Subtract)

✿Bump! Skip Count by 10s (Up to 120)

✿Feed the Monsters (Skill Game You Grew Up With! “Shut the Box” Game)

✿Monster Smoosh Addition Four in a Row: Pick ANY problem. No dice. Add to 20)

✿Monster Smoosh Subtraction Four in a Row: (Pick ANY problem. No dice. Subtract from 20)

✿Monster Smoosh Mixed Four in a Row: Pick ANY problem. No dice. Add to 10)

✿Monster Moolah (Coin Recognition Game: Heads and Tails)

✿Holler For The Dollar (Make ten/Collect Ten Dimes)

✿Time for Monsters Bump-A-Rama (Hour and Half Hour)

Check out some of my other products!

❤❤❤SAVE MONEY! A Great Deal!❤❤❤

BUNDLED Punch-a-Bunch: Addition-Subtraction-Mixed Facts

Punch-a-Bunch: Addition Facts (1-20)

Punch-a-Bunch: Subtraction Facts (1-20)

Punch-a-Bunch: Mixed Addition and Subtraction Facts (1-20)

✿Check out my Ninja/Karate themed Master Mathematician Award

✿Check out my All-Star Mathematician Award sports theme!

Superhero Calendar Set (English and Spanish)

Apple Themed Calendar Pieces

Pirate Duckies Calendar Pieces (English & Spanish)

Space Theme Calendar Set

Right before calendar time, I have a math OPEN-ENDED Do-Now Journal. If you're not using open-ended math questions for journals/ do-nows, or homework, you may want to take a peek!

Bundled Open-Ended Math Questions First/Second Grade

See Blog Posting about Open-Ended Questions and see them in action:

The Value of Open-Ended Questions

Check out a few of my other first grade math products:

If you found this product helpful, take a peek at

Practice Makes Perfect: Balancing Equations

Practice Makes Perfect: Addition & Subtraction Worksheets

Practice Makes Perfect: Names for Numbers

Practice Makes Perfect: Highlight Sums and Differences to 10

Bundled Math Practice Makes Perfect

Language Arts:

Book It: Retell It, Write It, Make It! First Day Jitters

Practice Makes Perfect: Their, There, They're

Practice Makes Perfect: Your and You're

Practice Makes Perfect: To, Too, Two Homophone Activities and FunSheets

Practice Makes Perfect Then vs. Than Activities and Worksheets

Let's keep in touch!

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Total Pages
45 student pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. Mathematically proficient students notice if calculations are repeated, and look both for general methods and for shortcuts. Upper elementary students might notice when dividing 25 by 11 that they are repeating the same calculations over and over again, and conclude they have a repeating decimal. By paying attention to the calculation of slope as they repeatedly check whether points are on the line through (1, 2) with slope 3, middle school students might abstract the equation (𝑦 – 2)/(𝑥 – 1) = 3. Noticing the regularity in the way terms cancel when expanding (𝑥 – 1)(𝑥 + 1), (𝑥 – 1)(𝑥² + 𝑥 + 1), and (𝑥 – 1)(𝑥³ + 𝑥² + 𝑥 + 1) might lead them to the general formula for the sum of a geometric series. As they work to solve a problem, mathematically proficient students maintain oversight of the process, while attending to the details. They continually evaluate the reasonableness of their intermediate results.
Look for and make use of structure. Mathematically proficient students look closely to discern a pattern or structure. Young students, for example, might notice that three and seven more is the same amount as seven and three more, or they may sort a collection of shapes according to how many sides the shapes have. Later, students will see 7 × 8 equals the well remembered 7 × 5 + 7 × 3, in preparation for learning about the distributive property. In the expression 𝑥² + 9𝑥 + 14, older students can see the 14 as 2 × 7 and the 9 as 2 + 7. They recognize the significance of an existing line in a geometric figure and can use the strategy of drawing an auxiliary line for solving problems. They also can step back for an overview and shift perspective. They can see complicated things, such as some algebraic expressions, as single objects or as being composed of several objects. For example, they can see 5 – 3(𝑥 – 𝑦)² as 5 minus a positive number times a square and use that to realize that its value cannot be more than 5 for any real numbers 𝑥 and 𝑦.
Attend to precision. Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.
Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s; write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.
Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies. By end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.

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