Pixels, Art, & the History of Video Games: Using tech to reinforce math concepts

Grade Levels
3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th
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9.64 MB   |   52 pages

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Pixels, Art, and the History of Video Games: Using creative technology to reinforce math concepts!

Take your students back to a time when Pong was the most exciting video game!
Teach your students about the evolution of video gaming technology and graphics!
This package is meant to be a fun and engaging extension to math concepts such as perimeter, area, fractions, and arrays. Use pixels as units, display resolution to reinforce arrays, and computer memory to teach pixel coordinate plotting!
All the information you need to know before teaching this is IN the PowerPoint presentation. Take your time going through it before you present it.


After viewing the Pixel Art PowerPoint, try having your students complete these included activities:

1. Display Resolution: This worksheet makes the connection between display resolution and arrays. Students must draw an array to illustrate a given resolution, then use that array to figure out how many pixels are on the screen. On the next page students must figure out the resolution and pixel count of a given array.
2. 8-Bit Sprite Design: This worksheet ask students to create their own sprite (character) within a 16x16 pixel boundary. Students cannot draw diagonal lines and must completely fill in each used “pixel” with a single color. Just like the 8-bit graphics from Nintendo’s NES, students can only use 4 colors.
3. 8-Bit Sprite Design – Part II: Students must transfer their sprite from the previous page onto a smaller grid, then complete the following questions (area, perimeter, >, <, =, fractions).
4. 8-Bit Sprite Design – Practice Paper: This page has four 16x16 pixel areas for your students to creatively “draw” in.
5. 8-Bit Sprite Design – Part III: This worksheet gives students 2 different characters to translate into 8-bit graphics. Then asks them to complete some questions regarding their graphic (areas).
6. Pixel Plotting: This worksheet explains the method consoles use to remember where different colored pixels go. Students are asked to color in different pixels based on a list of given coordinates to reveal the mystery sprite! **Technically the graph is in Quadrant IV (the way computers do it).. So you may want to emphasize that normally we go up the y-axis and not down.
7. Also in this package is a separate .pdf which outlines how to use Microsoft Paint to create pixel art. You can also try out: www.make8bitart.com

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns please feel free to contact me at melindagram@gmail.com and/or leave some feedback! :)
Check out my Blog, Pinterest, and Facebook page for great ideas and giveaways!
Total Pages
52
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A

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Pixels, Art, & the History of Video Games: Using tech to r
Pixels, Art, & the History of Video Games: Using tech to r
Pixels, Art, & the History of Video Games: Using tech to r
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