Place Value Intervention or Extra Practice Folder

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Format
PDF (49 MB|55 pages)
Standards
$4.00
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Digital Download
List Price:
$5.00
You Save:
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Description

This is a no-prep, dry erase place value intervention folder for two and three-digits. Students use these folders for extra practice or intervention time with an adult helper!

They’re designed for teachers, instructional assistants, paraprofessionals, parent volunteers, student interns, or any adult to work with students who may need extra help in a one-on-one setting without you having to print, copy, or create tons of activities for them to use.

The pages are placed in sheet protectors inside of a pronged folder (or small binder). In the inside pocket, I have the “Progress Notes” page. This is for my helper to quickly fill out after they work with a student to let me know what they worked on more specifically and any notes I may need to know.

In this resource you will find 50 pages of 2 and 3-digit place value activities that any adult can easily implement with your students. You will receive two folder cover options. One is labeled "Place Value Intervention Folder" and the other is the "Place Value Extra Practice Folder". You will also get Progress Notes Tracking Sheets to keep a detailed list about which students worked on this skill and how they did.

The only thing you will need to do after you purchase this resource is print it, place the pages in sheet protectors inside a folder or small binder, add a dry erase marker, and you're ready to go for place value intervention!

Other intervention resources available:

- Addition & Subtraction Facts to 20

© Simply Creative Teaching

Total Pages
55 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form.
The numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds (and 0 tens and 0 ones).
100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens - called a “hundred.”
Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones. Understand the following as special cases:
The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).

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