Poetry Break! - Limericks by Edward Lear-PDF and Google Slides-Distance Learning

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2 Ratings
Ms Cottons Corner
163 Followers
Grade Levels
3rd - 5th
Standards
Resource Type
Formats Included
  • PDF
  • Google Apps™
Pages
55 pages
$3.50
$3.50
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Ms Cottons Corner
163 Followers
Includes Google Apps™
The Teacher-Author indicated this resource includes assets from Google Workspace (e.g. docs, slides, etc.).

Description

Are you looking for a fun way to improve Reading Comprehension? This resource gives students practice with comprehension standards in making inferences, using context clues, fluency - and poetry! These lighthearted limericks will have your students laughing and loving poetry, and the text dependent questions will hone their reading comprehension skills. Because limericks originated in Ireland, this is perfect for St. Patrick's Day, or for any day that you want to bring a smile to your students!


This Poetry Break features the limericks of Edward Lear, widely known as the "father of limericks". This is a great lesson for St. Patrick's Day, or any day that you want your students to play with language and have fun learning! Students will practice reading aloud (which improves fluency), practice using context to learn new words and to make inferences, and write their own limerick! The resource guides students through the writing process to produce their own, fun poem. You can hit a lot of standards in two days!

You get:

1. Suggestions for teaching the poems, including biographical information about Edward Lear and information about the form of a limerick.

2. A book of Nonsense including 10 limericks

3. Color Task cards of the poems

4. Two student practice sheets.

-One to practice using context clues and language - Answer Key Included!

-One to guide students through the process of writing their own limerick - Student sample included!

5. A three-page Poetry Glossary

6. Google Slides of the Task Cards

7. Google Slides of the Students Sheets

8. Google Slides of the Poetry Glossary

Check out this blog post about bringing poetry to your classroom.

Take a break for Poetry!

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Interested in more Poetry fun? Try these other great resources for teaching poetry.

Poetry Break Routine - FREE!

Poetry Break - Poems About School - No Prep!

Poetry Break! A Birthday by Christina Rossetti - No Prep!

Poetry Break! - Wind and Window Flower by Robert Frost - No Prep!

Poetry Break! - A Ring Upon Her Finger by Christina Rossetti - No Prep!

Poetry Break! - Valentine's Day Mini Unit - No Prep

A Visit from St. Nicholas - No Prep holiday activities

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Thank you for your feedback and comments. I read every one, and they help me create with my students, and yours, in mind!

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Thank you, and Happy Teaching!

Susan

Total Pages
55 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
2 days
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.
Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).
Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

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