Point of View Lesson

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Format
PDF (444 KB|9 pages)
Standards
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Description

In this lesson students will explore multiple perspectives by conducting a 360 degree analysis of an event in a novel or in history and/or fictional characters or historical or current individuals. Students will analyze reactions of three historical or current figures or three fictional characters to a specific event in history or in fiction and/or multiple perspectives of a fictional character or historical or current individual. Students will include their own perspective of the event or a fictional character or historical or current individual.

Grades: 8 – 12 (easily adapted for 7th grade)

Potential uses of this lesson:
• Identifying an event in a novel and conducting an analysis of how this event was perceived from multiple perspectives.
• Identifying a historical or current event and conducting an analysis of how this event was perceived from multiple perspectives.
• Identifying a main character of a novel and conducting an analysis of other characters’ perspectives of the character.
• Identifying a historical or current individual and conducting an analysis of others’ perspectives of this individual.

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Total Pages
9 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
2 days
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

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