Point of View in Expository Writing

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

This product helps teachers teach a skill that is often just touched upon in textbooks. Students are first introduced to first person, second person, and third person points of view. Then they are asked to identify point of view in various sentences and then to apply the skill by creating sentences in the three points of view.

Next they are presented with four identical paragraphs and are asked to insert appropriate pronouns (from a word box) for the point of view designated for each paragraph.

NOTE: There are two separate paragraphs for first person point of view singular and as part of a group. As I writing teacher, I find that students can usually grasp the singular pronouns but have a hard time accepting"we, us, our, ours, and ourselves" as representing the same point of view as "I, me, mine, etc."

Students are then asked to analyze the points of view through the following questions:
1. Scan each paragraph on pages 4 and 5 again. Which perspective creates the closest connection between the writer and the reader? If you���re not sure, consider this: Which point of view/paragraph is aimed at “laying a guilt trip” on readers for not appreciating the freedoms they have in this country?

2. Now decide which point of view creates the most distant connection between the writer and the reader. Why do you think most expository writing is written from this perspective?

3. Reread the topic sentence in the last paragraph on page 5. Note that even though it contains the writer’s opinion, it does not start with “I think” or “I believe.” Keep in mind that even though you might be stating your opinion, the pronoun “I” cannot be used in third person point of view. Consider this: How does the omission of such phrases as “I think” and “I believe” strengthen the topic sentence?

4. Finally, go back to page 1 of the packet and scan the second paragraph of each point of view definition (NOTE TO TEACHERS: These paragraphs connect students' experiences to points of view.) Why do you think the author decided to write these activities in second person point of view as opposed to third person?

Here is my answer, as the author, to #4:
From the author: I chose second person point of view for these activities because I wanted to establish a friendly connection with the students who will use this packet. Writing can be an intimidating undertaking, so I wanted to make students feel more at ease while learning what might be new skills to them. Also, I used second person perspective to connect students’ experiences with the information in the packet (“You use first person point of view when you…”) in an attempt to make them feel as if they are a part of the writing.

Students are next asked to revise 15 sentences that are written in first and second person points of view to third person. NOTE: Again, as a writing teacher, I see my students struggle to replace first and second person pronouns with generic words such as "people," "a person," "students," etc. This section addresses this topic directly--something I've never seen in textbooks.

Next, students are given a practice test in which they revise first and second person point of view pronouns to third in a short essay.

Finally, the packet ends with students taking a real test, applying third person pronouns to a longer personal narrative essay.

A complete answer key is provided.

DOWNLOAD THE PREVIEW TO SEE SOME OF THE ACTUAL TEXT!

Here is my complete line of Looking Good on Paper products:

* AVOIDING EMPTY SUBJECTS: IT and THERE (5 pages)
Students learn when to use and when to avoid starting clauses with IT and THERE and practice using four methods to eliminate them from their writing. Great for strengthening sentences!

* POINT OF VIEW IN EXPOSITORY WRITING (17 pages)
Students discover the importance of considering which point of view to use in their writing. A valuable writing skill!

* FOUR METHODS FOR VARYING SENTENCE BEGINNINGS (22 pages)
Students practice adding variety to sentences using appositive, infinitive, prepositional, and participial phrases. Easy to understand and apply to their own writing!

* CAPITALIZING TITLES (9 pages)
Students use inductive reasoning to discover capitalization rules as they apply to titles. Reinforces the rules so much better than simply presenting a list of them to students!

*PERSONAL NARRATIVE ESSAYS Lesson Plan (19 pages)
Students are introduced to the parts of a narrative essay: intro paragraph, hook, main idea statement, rising action, climax and falling action. They also discover the importance of mood and dialogue in stories. Includes essay assignment and rubric. Great sample essays!

* SIX-STEP PRE-WRITING PROCESS FOR PERSUASIVE ESSAYS (10 pages)
This packet provides students with everything they need to prepare for writing a persuasive essay. An excellent resource!

* INTRO TO WRITING UNIT DISCUSSION: HOW IS WRITING DIFFERENT FROM SPEAKING? (3 pages)
An excellent way to reinforce the differences between writing and speaking and a great icebreaker for starting a writing unit!

* TEN WAYS WRITERS ESTABLISH MOOD (6 pages)
This lesson shows students how important mood is in writing and provides them with ten methods writers use to establish mood. Perfect for personal narratives or creative writing!

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Total Pages
15
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
3 hours

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Point of View in Expository Writing
Point of View in Expository Writing
Point of View in Expository Writing
Point of View in Expository Writing
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