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Pokemon Multiplication & Division Memory Game + Flashcards Bundle!

Grade Levels
2nd - 5th, Adult Education
Standards
Formats Included
  • Zip
Pages
26 pages
$4.00
Bundle
List Price:
$5.00
You Save:
$1.00
$4.00
Bundle
List Price:
$5.00
You Save:
$1.00
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Products in this Bundle (2)

    Bonus

    Instructions!

    Description

    This is a bundle product of both 1-12 Multiplication and Division Memory Game + Flashcards with a fun, Pokemon theme!

    The Backstory:

    My son absolutely loves Pokemon and is struggling with his basic multiplication and division facts. I wanted to create something that would be engaging for him, especially because his learning disabilities (mainly dyslexia) make traditional flashcards or timed activities challenging.

    How To Use This Resource:

    These cards function in two ways:

    1. You can print, laminate, and cut them into cards for a memory game. Flip them over (I'd suggest starting with one sheet or two sheets max) and play like traditional memory. The person with the most pairs at the end wins!

    2. Print, laminate, and cut. Then use them as fast flashcards. They're smaller than traditional cards, but they're visually appealing which can be fun for kids who struggle

    with rote memorization.

    Total Pages
    26 pages
    Answer Key
    Included
    Teaching Duration
    N/A
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    Standards

    to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
    Model with mathematics. Mathematically proficient students can apply the mathematics they know to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace. In early grades, this might be as simple as writing an addition equation to describe a situation. In middle grades, a student might apply proportional reasoning to plan a school event or analyze a problem in the community. By high school, a student might use geometry to solve a design problem or use a function to describe how one quantity of interest depends on another. Mathematically proficient students who can apply what they know are comfortable making assumptions and approximations to simplify a complicated situation, realizing that these may need revision later. They are able to identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their relationships using such tools as diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flowcharts and formulas. They can analyze those relationships mathematically to draw conclusions. They routinely interpret their mathematical results in the context of the situation and reflect on whether the results make sense, possibly improving the model if it has not served its purpose.
    Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, "Does this make sense?" They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.
    Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime or composite.
    Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., interpret 35 = 5 × 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations.
    Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.

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