Princess for Following Directions, Describing and Using Semantic Features

Princess for Following Directions, Describing and Using Semantic Features
Princess for Following Directions, Describing and Using Semantic Features
Princess for Following Directions, Describing and Using Semantic Features
Princess for Following Directions, Describing and Using Semantic Features
Princess for Following Directions, Describing and Using Semantic Features
Princess for Following Directions, Describing and Using Semantic Features
Princess for Following Directions, Describing and Using Semantic Features
Princess for Following Directions, Describing and Using Semantic Features
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9 MB|20 pages
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Product Description
For all the little girls who love princesses!

Model how to describe the picture so that another person can create a matching picture. Tell the students that they CANNOT point or say “Right there.” The goal is for them to give specific directions.

Select the number of pieces that would be needed to complete the task. If the task is to follow a simple direction, select only one item representing the feature (ex. the princess carrying a purse; holding a . . . , looking at . . ., ). If more than one feature is the target, select multiple examples (ex. the princess with a heart necklace and a pink dress, or the princess with a heart necklace and a purple dress). A more complex level requires the use of directionality, color, and/or position. (ex. The prince and princess standing in front of the castle at night; Directionality/Prepositional phrases: , below, to the right of, next to, in front of, beside, on top of, in, on, in back of, to the left of, over, under)

Place a barrier between the two students.

Option 1: One student takes a completed Princess Card. That student will describe or give the directions to the other student who will have the scene mat and the pieces needed to complete the picture.

Option 2: Print duplicates of the mats and pieces needed. Two students have a blank mat (forest only) and a matching set of pieces. The student doing the describing makes up his/her own picture. (the SLP could designate which pieces are to be used). Allowing students to make their own creations gives them the opportunity to use referential communication when they have to describe their own pictures. This skill also transfers the classroom setting when they are asked to write about their own pictures. 

Print on card stock and laminate. Cut out the cards used to describe and each of the pieces individually.

Princesses Barrier Game by Kathy Grover is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Total Pages
20 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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