Problem Solving Strategies - Word Problems Grades 1 - 3

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This unit contains a strategy sheet for solving word problems and 5 sets of word problems (5 in each set for a total of 25 word problems) that can be solved in at least three different ways: Look for a Pattern, Write an Equation, Make a Table or Chart.
Three Answers keys are included for each problem sheet showing each different solving strategy.
The problems included are all based on 2’s, 5’s and 10’s in order to allow 1st – 3rd graders a chance to solve by skip counting, repeated addition and/or multiplication.

Common Core Math Elements Covered:
First Grade:
CCSS.Math.Content.1.OA.A.1
Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.1
CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1
Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral.
CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.C.4
Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.

Second Grade:
CCSS.Math.Content.2.OA.A.1
Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.1
Work with equal groups of objects to gain foundations for multiplication.
CCSS.Math.Content.2.OA.C.3
Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s; write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.
CCSS.Math.Content.2.OA.C.4
Use addition to find the total number of objects arranged in rectangular arrays with up to 5 rows and up to 5 columns; write an equation to express the total as a sum of equal addends.
CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.2
Count within 1000; skip-count by 5s, 10s, and 100s.
CCSS.Math.Content.2.MD.C.8
Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately. Example: If you have 2 dimes and 3 pennies, how many cents do you have?

Third Grade:
CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.1
Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.
CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.3
Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.1
CCSS.Math.Content.3.NBT.A.2
Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
CCSS.Math.Content.3.NBT.A.3
Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (e.g., 9 × 80, 5 × 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.

TEKS Covered (Texas Based Curriculum)
1st Grade
(1) Mathematical process standards. The student uses mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding. The student is expected to:
(A) apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace;
(B) use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution;
(C) select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems;
(D) communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate;
(E) create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical ideas;
(F) analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas; and
(G) display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.
(2) Number and operations. The student applies mathematical process standards to represent and compare whole numbers, the relative position and magnitude of whole numbers, and relationships within the numeration system related to place value. The student is expected to:
(A) recognize instantly the quantity of structured arrangements;
(B) use concrete and pictorial models to compose and decompose numbers up to 120 in more than one way as so many hundreds, so many tens, and so many ones;
(C) use objects, pictures, and expanded and standard forms to represent numbers up to 120;
(3) Number and operations. The student applies mathematical process standards to develop and use strategies for whole number addition and subtraction computations in order to solve problems. The student is expected to:
(A) use concrete and pictorial models to determine the sum of a multiple of 10 and a one-digit number in problems up to 99;
(D) apply basic fact strategies to add and subtract within 20, including making 10 and decomposing a number leading to a 10;
(E) explain strategies used to solve addition and subtraction problems up to 20 using spoken words, objects, pictorial models, and number sentences; and
(F) generate and solve problem situations when given a number sentence involving addition or subtraction of numbers within 20.
(4) Number and operations. The student applies mathematical process standards to identify coins, their values, and the relationships among them in order to recognize the need for monetary transactions. The student is expected to:
(B) write a number with the cent symbol to describe the value of a coin; and
(C) use relationships to count by twos, fives, and tens to determine the value of a collection of pennies, nickels, and/or dimes.
(5) Algebraic reasoning. The student applies mathematical process standards to identify and apply number patterns within properties of numbers and operations in order to describe relationships. The student is expected to:
(B) skip count by twos, fives, and tens to determine the total number of objects up to 120 in a set;
(D) represent word problems involving addition and subtraction of whole numbers up to 20 using concrete and pictorial models and number sentences;
(8) Data analysis. The student applies mathematical process standards to organize data to make it useful for interpreting information and solving problems. The student is expected to:
(B) use data to create picture and bar-type graphs; and
(C) draw conclusions and generate and answer questions using information from picture and bar-type graphs.

2nd Grade
(1) Mathematical process standards. The student uses mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding. The student is expected to:
(A) apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace;
(B) use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution;
(C) select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems;
(D) communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate;
(E) create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical ideas;
(F) analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas; and
(G) display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.
(4) Number and operations. The student applies mathematical process standards to develop and use strategies and methods for whole number computations in order to solve addition and subtraction problems with efficiency and accuracy. The student is expected to:
(A) recall basic facts to add and subtract within 20 with automaticity;
(B) add up to four two-digit numbers and subtract two-digit numbers using mental strategies and algorithms based on knowledge of place value and properties of operations;
(C) solve one-step and multi-step word problems involving addition and subtraction within 1,000 using a variety of strategies based on place value, including algorithms; and
(D) generate and solve problem situations for a given mathematical number sentence involving addition and subtraction of whole numbers within 1,000.
(5) Number and operations. The student applies mathematical process standards to determine the value of coins in order to solve monetary transactions. The student is expected to:
(A) determine the value of a collection of coins up to one dollar; and
(B) use the cent symbol, dollar sign, and the decimal point to name the value of a collection of coins.
(6) Number and operations. The student applies mathematical process standards to connect repeated addition and subtraction to multiplication and division situations that involve equal groupings and shares. The student is expected to:
(A) model, create, and describe contextual multiplication situations in which equivalent sets of concrete objects are joined.

3rd Grade
(1) Mathematical process standards. The student uses mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding. The student is expected to:
(A) apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace;
(B) use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution;
(C) select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems;
(D) communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate;
(E) create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical ideas;
(F) analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas; and
(G) display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.
(4) Number and operations. The student applies mathematical process standards to develop and use strategies and methods for whole number computations in order to solve problems with efficiency and accuracy. The student is expected to:
(A) solve with fluency one-step and two-step problems involving addition and subtraction within 1,000 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and the relationship between addition and subtraction;
(C) determine the value of a collection of coins and bills;
(D) determine the total number of objects when equally-sized groups of objects are combined or arranged in arrays up to 10 by 10;
(E) represent multiplication facts by using a variety of approaches such as repeated addition, equal-sized groups, arrays, area models, equal jumps on a number line, and skip counting;
(F) recall facts to multiply up to 10 by 10 with automaticity.
(H) determine the number of objects in each group when a set of objects is partitioned into equal shares or a set of objects is shared equally;
(K) solve one-step and two-step problems involving multiplication and division within 100 using strategies based on objects; pictorial models, including arrays, area models, and equal groups; properties of operations; or recall of facts.
(5) Algebraic reasoning. The student applies mathematical process standards to analyze and create patterns and relationships. The student is expected to:
(A) represent one- and two-step problems involving addition and subtraction of whole numbers to 1,000 using pictorial models, number lines, and equations;
(B) represent and solve one- and two-step multiplication and division problems within 100 using arrays, strip diagrams, and equations;
(C) describe a multiplication expression as a comparison such as 3 x 24 represents 3 times as much as 24;
(E) represent real-world relationships using number pairs in a table and verbal descriptions.
Total Pages
24
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A

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Problem Solving Strategies - Word Problems Grades 1 - 3
Problem Solving Strategies - Word Problems Grades 1 - 3
Problem Solving Strategies - Word Problems Grades 1 - 3
Problem Solving Strategies - Word Problems Grades 1 - 3
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