Prohibition and the Temperance Movement- 18th Amendment Lesson plan

Prohibition and the Temperance Movement- 18th Amendment Lesson plan
Prohibition and the Temperance Movement- 18th Amendment Lesson plan
Prohibition and the Temperance Movement- 18th Amendment Lesson plan
Prohibition and the Temperance Movement- 18th Amendment Lesson plan
Prohibition and the Temperance Movement- 18th Amendment Lesson plan
Prohibition and the Temperance Movement- 18th Amendment Lesson plan
Prohibition and the Temperance Movement- 18th Amendment Lesson plan
Prohibition and the Temperance Movement- 18th Amendment Lesson plan
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Prohibition and the Temperance Movement- 18th Amendment Lesson plan

Temperance Movement
Temperance Movement: Organized effort beginning in the 1830s to reduce the amount of alcohol that people drank. Beginning in the 1830s supporters of the temperance movement began to promote total abstinence, or not drinking alcohol at all. They tried to get laws passed that would prohibit, or stop, people from making, selling or transporting alcohol. Ultimately these “prohibitionists” succeeded in getting Congress to propose an amendment to the US Constitution- the 18th Amendment0 that made it illegal to manufacture, sell , transport, import, or export alcohol.

The Eighteenth Amendment was ratified in 1919, and went into effect on January 16, 1920, making it illegal to drink, make , sell or transport alcohol.


Task # 1
Directions: Brainstorm reasons as to why people who supported the temperance movement might have wanted prohibition people from drinking.




Task # 2:
Directions: Read “the Drunkard’s Home” engraving from Uncle Tom’s Cabin and American Culture, and answer the following questions
1. How has the father’s drinking affected his family?


2. Describe the emotions of the mother and Children (What are the emotional effects of alcohol on family members of those who drink?


3. Would you want to live in this home? Why or why not?



Task # 3: Look at “The Moral and Physical Thermometer” in and Inquiry into the Effects of Ardent Spirals on the Human Mind and Body by Benjamin Rush, and answer the following questions
1. What are some of the physical ailments/diseases caused by alcohol according to Rush?


2. According to this chart, drinking leads to what kinds of criminal activities?



3. What punishments might the drunken person suffer?



Task #4: The aims of the temperance advocates were to improve health, decrease crime, and protect women and children. Why might some people have been against laws that made it illegal to drink alcohol?






Task # 5: Read The Anti-prohibition Manual: A Summary of Facts and Figures Dealing with Prohibition, and come up with some (5) conclusions as to why people were against the Temperance movement directly from the article




Task 6:
1. How much money (revenue) would a National prohibition law cause the US Government to lose ?


2. Where do you think this revenue comes from?


3. It has always been an acknowledged right that freedom of choice be granted to all as long as the exercise of this right in no way conflicted with the right of others. How can the Prohibitionists stand up and tell us that by taking a drink man infringes upon the rights of others? By preventing man from freedom of choice in the matter of drink the Prohibitionists violates his right by destroying his freedom. How could prohibition violate individual rights?


Task 7: Songs
1. Read through the song lyrics in this packet several times. If audio recordings are available, listen to the songs as well.
2. As a group, fill out one “Song Analysis Worksheet” for each song in the packet.
3. Choose 2 songs that you think are the most effective. Write a 5 sentences discussing why you think that these songs are effective and noting what persuasive techniques these songs employ.

19th Century Temperance Song Analysis Worksheet- song # 1

Name of Song_________________________________________


If your song can be played, listen to your song first. Then read through the lyrics several times and discuss them with your group before you begin filling out this sheet. If no examples exist, just write “none” in the space provided and move on. Be sure to check with the instructor if you have any questions!

Personal Appeal: Do the lyrics appeal to a particular person such as a father, young woman, grandparent, teacher, etc? How? Provide specific evidence and examples.



Intellectual Appeal: Do the lyrics present an argument against the sale and/or consumption of alcohol on intellectual grounds (i.e. “alcohol poisons the body”)? Provide specific evidence and examples.



Social or Moral Appeal: Do the lyrics present an argument against the sale and/or consumption of alcohol on moral or social ground (ie, “good Christians don’t drink,” “drinking leads to poverty”)? Provide specific evidence and examples.



Emotional Appeal: Do the lyrics attempt to persuade people not to drink and/or sell alcohol by appealing to their emotions? How? Provide specific evidence and examples.



Other: What other persuasive techniques are used in the song? Do the lyrics contrast the drunkard with the temperance man? Do the lyrics provide some alternative to using alcohol? Are any famous examples or stories mentioned? Provide specific evidence and examples.



Message: Overall, what is the main message (or messages) that this song is trying to send to the person who hears it?



19th Century Temperance Song Analysis Worksheet – Song # 2

Name of Song_________________________________________


If your song can be played, listen to your song first. Then read through the lyrics several times and discuss them with your group before you begin filling out this sheet. If no examples exist, just write “none” in the space provided and move on. Be sure to check with the instructor if you have any questions!

Personal Appeal: Do the lyrics appeal to a particular person such as a father, young woman, grandparent, teacher, etc? How? Provide specific evidence and examples.



Intellectual Appeal: Do the lyrics present an argument against the sale and/or consumption of alcohol on intellectual grounds (i.e. “alcohol poisons the body”)? Provide specific evidence and examples.



Social or Moral Appeal: Do the lyrics present an argument against the sale and/or consumption of alcohol on moral or social ground (ie, “good Christians don’t drink,” “drinking leads to poverty”)? Provide specific evidence and examples.



Emotional Appeal: Do the lyrics attempt to persuade people not to drink and/or sell alcohol by appealing to their emotions? How? Provide specific evidence and examples.



Other: What other persuasive techniques are used in the song? Do the lyrics contrast the drunkard with the temperance man? Do the lyrics provide some alternative to using alcohol? Are any famous examples or stories mentioned? Provide specific evidence and examples.



Message: Overall, what is the main message (or messages) that this song is trying to send to the person who hears it?





Because Prohibition went into effect throughout the US on January 16, 1920 and was a Constitutional amendment, the American people did not vote directly on whether or not to accept Prohibition. Instead, their elected state representatives and senators voted to pass the Eighteenth Amendment on their own behalf.

Prohibition was not a popular idea among the American people and it provided difficult to enforce. During prohibition, Americans had to turn to illegal methods to make, buy or sell liquor. “Bootleggers” illegally made their own alcohol and often sold it on the “black market” for a huge profit. People drank illegal liquor purchased at “speak easies”, “blind tigers”, or “blind pigs”. Organized crime grew as gangsters such as Al Capone got rich by smuggling alcohol. Jails became crowded as police officers tried to enforce Prohibition.

Prohibition lasted for thirteen years, from 1920 to 1933. In 1933 the Twenty-first Amendment repealed the Eighteenth Amendment. This time, state conventions were used to vote on the Twenty First Amendment. Conventions were generally made up of ordinary citizens , not law makers, so it was thought that the conventions would better represent the opinion of the American people. Each state convention cast one vote to repeal Prohibition.

Task #7:
Now your will role-play a different individual with interests in either the Temperance/Prohibition movement or in the liquor business. You will compose a letter to the editor of the New York Times, a newspaper of the era, from the perspective your character.

In writing your editorial, you should try to answer the following questions from the perspective of their characters and as if you are reacting to a proposed Prohibition amendment in 1918:
1. Do you think that there is a problem with alcohol use in America? Why or why not?


2. Do you support the proposed Eighteenth Amendment that would prohibit the manufacture, sale, and transport of alcoholic beverages? Why or why not?


3. If Prohibition should go into effect, what do you predict the results will be?


4. What would Prohibition mean to you?



















Prohibition – Simpsons
https://tune.pk/video/6218952/18-homer-vs-the-eighteenth-amendment


1. What happens to Bart on St Patrick’s Day?
__________________________________________________________________

2. Who do the protesters tell the judge to think about?
__________________________________________________________________

3. The newspaper states “Alcohol Prohibited in Springfield.” What does the word
prohibited mean?
__________________________________________________________________

4. What happens to all the Duff beer in Springfield?
__________________________________________________________________

5. What is Moe’s pet shop turned into? __________________________________________________________________

6. Why don’t the police stop bootlegger gangsters bringing alcohol into Springfield?
__________________________________________________________________

7. Why did Homer think prohibition was at good thing at first?
__________________________________________________________________

8. Homer and Bart become bootleggers. What do they use to hide the alcohol in?
__________________________________________________________________

9. What does Marge think about the prohibition law? (Her attitude reflects the
thoughts of many ordinary people in the 1920s).
__________________________________________________________________

10. What does Homer do when he runs out of beer?
__________________________________________________________________

11. At the end it is discovered that the prohibition law was repealed. What does the
word ‘repealed’ mean?
__________________________________________________________________


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