Proximity: Most Important Factor in Making a Friends (Pt 1)

Proximity: Most Important Factor in Making a Friends (Pt 1)
Proximity: Most Important Factor in Making a Friends (Pt 1)
Proximity: Most Important Factor in Making a Friends (Pt 1)
Proximity: Most Important Factor in Making a Friends (Pt 1)
Proximity: Most Important Factor in Making a Friends (Pt 1)
Proximity: Most Important Factor in Making a Friends (Pt 1)
Proximity: Most Important Factor in Making a Friends (Pt 1)
Proximity: Most Important Factor in Making a Friends (Pt 1)
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Proximity: The Most Important Factor in Making a Friendship (Part 1) is a high-interest article which is directly related to most students.

Exerpt

from ¶ 1 When we become friends with someone, it’s probably because we like each other’s personalities, or we share the same interests, for example, hobbies or certain sports. Perhaps it’s because we belong to the same group or have the same religion. These are all reasons why people become friends, but a researcher wanted to find out what is the one most important factor that determines if people will become friends with each other. The result is quite amazing.

The features of these units

  • Articles usually include references to some research studies that students can relate to.
  • The information is often counter-intuitive. Students gain some new insights from them.
  • Study guides involve a variety of comprehension questions and scaffolding paraphrasing ones and vocabulary exercises.
  • Each unit includes at least one “Reflection” exercise in which students write:

- I found some interesting/important information in this article.

- After reading this, I now would like to (learn more about /read more research about)

- There is some information in this article that I could apply to my life.

- I agree / disagree with the author about something.

- This article reminded me of (me/ my family/my friend).

- I was surprised by something in this article.

Exerpt

from ¶ 9 It seems reasonable that we are more likely to form relationships with people whom we run into often because we probably will have conversations with them. However, what happens if people see each other often but don’t say anything? An example of this is seeing the same person at our bus stop; perhaps we just nod to each other as a greeting but don’t talk. Psychologists call this type of interaction, “passive contact.” Richard Moreland and Scott Beach, two psychologists, wanted to find out if passive contact would affect how we felt about each other.

Part 2 has the study guide questions and vocabulary for the second half of the article.

For discussions about teaching ESL, please see my blog: https://commonsense-esl.com/

Total Pages
10 pages
Answer Key
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$3.00
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