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REDOX from oxidation number to electrochemical cells

REDOX from oxidation number to electrochemical cells
REDOX from oxidation number to electrochemical cells
REDOX from oxidation number to electrochemical cells
REDOX from oxidation number to electrochemical cells
REDOX from oxidation number to electrochemical cells
REDOX from oxidation number to electrochemical cells
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413 KB|19 pages
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This is a comprehensive PowerPoint geared for high school chemistry students. This starts with a recall of assigning oxidation numbers, followed by REDOX reactions, then electrochemical cells and ending with predicting which metals undergo oxidation and reduction using an activity series table.
This is a MINIMUM of 2 days of notes.
The length of time depends on the time spent explaining and providing independent practice. There are multiple states standards covered in this lesson along with some college level introductory information regarding REDOX.
Balancing REDOX is not in this lesson, it is currently under construction.
New York State Objectives:
Commencement Level Physical Setting, Chemistry
• An oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction involves the transfer of electrons (e-). (3.2d)
• Reduction is the gain of electrons. (3.2e)
• A half-reaction can be written to represent reduction. (3.2f)
• Oxidation is the loss of electrons. (3.2g)
• A half-reaction can be written to represent oxidation. (3.2h)
• In a redox reaction the number of electrons lost is equal to the number of electrons gained. (3.3b)
• Oxidation numbers (states) can be assigned to atoms and ions. Changes in oxidation numbers indicate that oxidation and reduction have occurred. (3.2i)
• An electrochemical cell can be either voltaic or electrolytic. In an electrochemical cell, oxidation occurs at the anode and reduction at the cathode. (3.2j) patina (copper-Statue of Liberty)
• A voltaic cell spontaneously converts chemical energy to electrical energy. (3.2k)
• An electrolytic cell requires electrical energy to produce chemical change. This process is known as electrolysis. (3.2l)
• Use an activity series (Table J) to determine whether a redox reaction is spontaneous
Total Pages
19 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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