Ratios and Proportions with Word Problems Task Cards

Format
PDF (2 MB|28 Task Cards/ Link to Digital Quiz)
Standards
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Description

Ratios and Proportions with Word Problems Task Cards. Now includes link to a Digital Quiz for Distance Learning** This 28 task card set is a great way for students to practice the concepts of solving ratio problems using proportions. This set includes 10 word problems.

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Made for 6th-9th Grade. Task cards are printer-ready and include an answer key.

**You will receive both the printable task cards and a Google Forms™ link so you can use the same task cards as a self-grading quiz. Students will get immediate feedback on how they answered each question once the form is turned in. Teachers can track student progress using the response tab at the top of the quiz!

Looking for other Middle School task card sets? Try these out:

Percent Proportions and Word Problems

Fraction, Percent, and Decimal Converstions

6th Grade- Expressions and Equations

6th Grade- Number System-Multiplication and Division

6th Grade- Number System- Rational Numbers

5th Grade Task Card Bundle

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Total Pages
28 Task Cards/ Link to Digital Quiz
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, "Does this make sense?" They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.
Use proportional relationships to solve multistep ratio and percent problems. Examples: simple interest, tax, markups and markdowns, gratuities and commissions, fees, percent increase and decrease, percent error.
Use ratio and rate reasoning to solve real-world and mathematical problems, e.g., by reasoning about tables of equivalent ratios, tape diagrams, double number line diagrams, or equations.
Understand the concept of a unit rate 𝘢/𝘣 associated with a ratio 𝘢:𝘣 with 𝘣 ≠ 0, and use rate language in the context of a ratio relationship. For example, “This recipe has a ratio of 3 cups of flour to 4 cups of sugar, so there is 3/4 cup of flour for each cup of sugar.” “We paid $75 for 15 hamburgers, which is a rate of $5 per hamburger.”
Understand the concept of a ratio and use ratio language to describe a ratio relationship between two quantities. For example, “The ratio of wings to beaks in the bird house at the zoo was 2:1, because for every 2 wings there was 1 beak.” “For every vote candidate A received, candidate C received nearly three votes.”

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