Reading to Understand and Remember, close reading & annotating,graphic organizer

Reading to Understand and Remember, close reading & annotating,graphic organizer
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Reading to Understand and Remember, close reading & annotating,graphic organizer
Reading to Understand and Remember, close reading & annotating,graphic organizerplay
Reading to Understand and Remember, close reading & annotating,graphic organizer
Reading to Understand and Remember, close reading & annotating,graphic organizer
Reading to Understand and Remember, close reading & annotating,graphic organizer
Reading to Understand and Remember, close reading & annotating,graphic organizer
Reading to Understand and Remember, close reading & annotating,graphic organizer
Standards
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  • StandardsNEW

Students will complete a graphic organizer as they read non-fiction.

Let’s face it--even high school students need help when it comes to reading. Many students are not fully engaged when they’re reading. They’re not used to close reading. I sometimes think that they believe passing their eyes over the words constitutes reading! Because students aren’t fully engaged, the result is they’re just skimming the surface. I like to explain it with this analogy: we only see 1/8 of an iceberg, 7/8 is underwater.

One way to help students dive deeper when reading non-fiction texts, in particular, is to have them annotate as they read.Studies show that the action of handwriting notes and annotating helps with comprehension. At the beginning of the school year, when I ask my students to annotate, many look perplexed.They haven’t been tasked with annotating before they get to me. They think annotating is simply underlining and circling just about everything! To help students learn how to annotate and thus read to understand and remember, I devised this graphic organizer.

What's included:

A Reading to Understand and Remember graphic organizer (best for non-fiction)

Teacher tips and suggestions on how to use this graphic organizer

*Note: I did not supply a rubric for this creative activity. This is in accordance with my educational philosophy as listed in my profile. Sometimes it's good to just let the students create and learn just for education's sake.

keywords: graphic organizer, close reading, annotating, non-fiction, analysis, captivate motivate educate

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).
Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Total Pages
N/A
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
1 hour
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