Regular Past Tense -d/-ed Ending Pronunciation Spoons Game

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The Gaming Grammarian
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Pages
29 pages
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Description

This set of cards (verbs that take the regular –d/-ed form in the past tense) can be used in a variety of ways. Students can sort the cards into the correct category based on the pronunciation of the –d/-ed ending. They can play a Memory-style game where they turn over two cards and see if the pronunciation of the final –d/-ed sound is the same. My students’ favorite way to use them though is playing Spoons.

Materials required but not included: Spoons

(You’ll need one fewer than the total number of people in each group; so if you have 28 students in groups of four, that’s seven groups, three spoons per group, a total of 21 spoons)—plastic spoons can be used, but I highly recommend using metal spoons. The plastic ones tend to break with more energetic groups and can have sharp edges when they do. You can get cheap metal spoons at dollar stores, Salvation Army, Good Will, garage sales, and a host of other places.

Preparation:

1. Print the cards, you’ll need one set for each group. I highly recommend printing on heavy cardstock and laminating them for durability (cold lamination is great and does not peel when cut through). They will get a bit beat up in this game. I also recommend printing each set of cards on a different color of cardstock. This will help you know which set a card belongs to when you find it on the floor later.

2. Place students in groups of 3-4.

3. Give each group a set of cards and spoons (one less spoon than the number of students in the group).

Object: Try to collect a set of four cards that share the same pronunciation of the final –d/-ed sound. Once a set is collected, that player takes a spoon from the center of the table (he/she can be sneaky about it, taking the spoon and continuing to play). After one player has taken a spoon, all other players race to get a spoon as well. The player without a spoon gets a letter. Any player who spells S-P-O-O-N is out. The last player standing is the winner.

How to play Spoons:

1. Place the spoons in the center of the group, use one less spoon than the number of people in the group (so a group of four students would use three spoons).

2. Deal out four cards to each player. Players look at their own cards but no one else’s.

3. Place all remaining cards in a face-down pile next to the dealer.

4. The dealer picks up the top card, looks at it, and decides to keep it or pass it.

5. The dealer passes 1 card (either the one from the pile or one from his/her hand) to the person on his/her right.

6. As cards are passed, students look at them one at a time, and pass one card (either the one viewed or one from the hand) to the next player. The last player places the cards in a discard pile next to him/her.

7. If the draw pile runs out, pause and reshuffle the discard pile to form a new draw pile.

8. Once a player has collected a set of four cards that all have the same pronunciation of the final –d/-ed sound, he/she takes a spoon from the center of the table. It is acceptable, even encouraged, to be sneaky about it, continuing to play if no one sees the player do it.

9. After one player has taken a spoon, all other players race to grab a spoon as well.

10. One player will not be able to grab a spoon. That player receives a letter.

11. If the original player who took a spoon makes a mistake (one or more of his/her cards does not have the same –d/-ed pronunciation), he/she also receives a letter.

12. Any player who collects all of the letters to spell S-P-O-O-N is out of the game.

13. The last player in the game is the winner.

Alternative play: Have a group of students that is not quite as competitive, or just prefer a less energetic game? Try these alternate rules.

Object: Collect pronunciation sets (four cards with the same pronunciation of the –d/-ed ending) and be the player with the lowest score at the end of the game.

How to Play:

1. Shuffle the cards and deal out four cards to each player. Players may look at their own cards only. Place remaining cards face down in the center of the table. Turn the top card over, place it face up next to the draw pile to form a discard pile.

2. The first player takes a card to form a hand of four cards. He/she may choose the top card from either the discard or draw pile.

3. The first player discards a card to bring his/her hand back down to three cards.

4. The second player then takes his/her turn by taking and discarding a card.

5. When a player has collected a pronunciation set, he/she lays down all four cards in front of him/her and discards a final time.

6. If the player was correct, and all his/her cards have the same final –d/-ed pronunciation, all remaining players get one more turn to try and form a set. If the player was not correct, he/she picks up his/her cards again and play resumes.

7. Once a player successfully compiles a set, and the final round is played, score the round by giving players points for the four cards remaining in their hand:

The first card of a particular sound = 1 point

The second card of a particular sound = 2 points

The third card of a particular sound = 3 points

Any player who successfully collects set scores zero points for the round.

The player with the lowest score at the end of the game is the winner.

For more practice with the pronunciation of the regular past tense -d/-ed ending, see these free games:

Regular Past Tense Verb Pronunciation Packing

Fishing for Regular Past Tense Verb Pronunciation

Total Pages
29 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A
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