Relative Clause Memory

Relative Clause Memory
Relative Clause Memory
Relative Clause Memory
Relative Clause Memory
Relative Clause Memory
Relative Clause Memory
Grade Levels
Resource Type
Common Core Standards
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2 MB|9 pages
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Product Description

Relative (adjective) clauses are difficult for students, especially ELLs. Even my more advanced adult learners struggle with them and so I try to provide a lot of scaffolding activities. We start with a presentation / lecture about relative (adjective) clauses to give them the overview. Then we use these cards as sort cards—students match the picture / noun card to the matching clause. Third we use these cards as a memory-style game. Finally we play Relative Clause Taboo (also available in my store, or both games are sold as a bundle called Relative Clause Games for a discount). By that point the students are usually ready to try some practice exercises in class and then do some for homework. Here are the details for the sort cards and memory-style games that I use these cards for:

1. Print off the cards and cut them. I suggest laminating them for durability. If you want to make it a little easier for students print the picture cards on one color of paper and the clause cards on a second color. This makes the game move a little faster because you don’t end up turning over two noun cards or two clause cards.

2. Sort: give each student (or group of students or place in a center) a set of cards that have been mixed up. Students then match the noun cards to the clause cards. You can walk around the room and check them immediately, have students pair up and check each other, or have students write down their answers on the recording sheet for you to look at later.

3. Memory: put students in groups of 2-4 and give each group a set of cards that have been mixed up. Students lay the cards out face-down on the table. The first student turns over two cards and checks if they go together. If the cards do not go together they are turned back over and play continues to the next student. If the cards go together the student must say a sentence using the cards (ie: This is a picture of George Washington, who was the first president of the United States.). If the student is able to form a correct sentence he/she takes the two cards as a “point” and turns over two more cards. The student continues his/her turn until either two cards are turned that do not match or he/she is unable to state a correct sentence.

Total Pages
9 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
30 minutes
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