Roles for Discussion

Roles for Discussion
Roles for Discussion
Roles for Discussion
Roles for Discussion
Roles for Discussion
Roles for Discussion
Standards
  • Product Description
  • StandardsNEW

Class discussions require training and this card will help you do that!

An important process of any discussion that involves referencing text is actually reading the text together. For most students though, this doesn’t come naturally. Previously to using this tool, discussions in my classes were more like going to a drive-thru. Speakers would quickly grab what they wanted and go, reading aloud a line or two and continuing on with their point hardly giving pause for the rest of the group to “digest” what they had heard, much less read or even find that part of the text for themselves. As an equity issue, it was clear my English Learners were at a significant disadvantage.

Then I began assigning students to be Text Directors and I noticed increased student participation, greater depth of understanding, and far more meaningful dialogue.

Make this an official role in your class discussions and you will see this too!

This foldable card, designed to be propped-up like a tent, outlines the protocols for reading a text together as a group. On one side of the card, sentence frames help the Text Director encourage their peers to follow them; the other side reminds the rest of the group to pause and "Get on the same page!”

I use this role and card as part of Literature Circles, during Socratic Seminars or any class or group activity that involves students reading and discussing text together. I print out about 8-10 copies on bright colored card stock so they can be re-used over and over again and collect them back at the end of each discussion. This card is not specific to discussing literature, but can be used in any discussion about any type of text.

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
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Gwen Heskett

Gwen Heskett

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