Romeo & Juliet Bundle - Reading Guide, Quizzes, Test, Close Reads & Keys

Romeo & Juliet Bundle - Reading Guide, Quizzes, Test, Close Reads & Keys
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18 Products in this Bundle
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    Bonus
    1 file
    Grammar Packet - Using Commas, Conjunctions & Semicolons
    Bundle Description

    This growing bundle of Romeo & Juliet materials makes teaching Shakespeare's drama easier. The following are included: an introductory PowerPoint, a comprehensive guide to promote active reading, a set of five general comprehension quizzes, several close reading exercises to encourage more in-depth analysis and understanding, and a summative unit test. Answer keys for all resources are included. Read on for more specific details on each individual item.

    1. A Comprehensive Reading Guide Organized by Act.

    The comprehensive reading guide includes the following:

    ♦98 total questions, broken up by act and scene. Questions could easily be transferred to an exam, or modified to accommodate your course's focus. The key offers detailed, but concise information -- and could easily double as lecture notes or an exam guide.

    ♦ 37 relevant quotes, broken up by act and scene. The key identifies the speaker and the context of each quote -- and, again, could easily double as lecture notes or an exam guide.

    The following plot details are addressed:

    ♦ Feuding in the streets

    ♦ The prince's declaration of punishment

    ♦ Romeo's despair at lost love

    ♦ Rosaline's decision

    ♦ Juliet's refusal to accept marriage

    ♦ Lord Capulet's beliefs toward the prospect of marriage

    ♦ Romeo's invite to Lord Capulet's party

    ♦ Paris

    ♦ Mercutio's harsh, sarcastic tone toward Romeo's heartbreak

    ♦ Queen Mab

    ♦ Romeo's foreshadowing prediction

    ♦ Tybalt's reaction to Romeo's presence (in contrast to Capulet's)

    ♦ Romeo's discovery of Juliet's identity

    ♦ Dramatic irony

    ♦ The rejection of names

    ♦ Romeo's fear of rejection

    ♦ Juliet's concern over acting hastily

    ♦ Juliet's desire for Romeo to send her a message

    ♦ Friar Laurence's beliefs on good and evil

    ♦ Friar Laurence's concerns for Romeo

    ♦ Romeo's request of Friar Laurence

    ♦ Friar Laurence's optimistic view of the union of Romeo and Juliet

    ♦ The Nurse's private conversation with Romeo

    ♦ The plan to marry Juliet

    ♦ The Nurse's comic relief

    ♦ Tybalt's verbal attack on Romeo

    ♦ Dramatic irony

    ♦ Mercutio's decision to fight Tybalt

    ♦ Romeo's abrupt character change

    ♦ Defying the prince's orders

    ♦ Lady Capulet's demand

    ♦ Romeo's punishment

    ♦ The Nurse's news and ensuing confusion

    ♦ Juliet's immediate reaction to learning the truth

    ♦ Juliet's defense of her husband

    ♦ The Nurse's motivation to seek out Romeo

    ♦ Romeo's feelings toward his punishment

    ♦ Friar Laurence's strong words for Romeo

    ♦ Romeo's potential suicide attempt

    ♦ Friar Laurence's optimistic plan

    ♦ Lord Capulet's arrangement with Paris

    ♦ Whether Romeo believes he will see his wife once more

    ♦ Foreshadowing

    ♦ Lady Capulet's plan for Romeo after exile

    ♦ The Nurse's advice to Juliet

    ♦ Juliet's desire to seek Friar Laurence's help

    ♦ Lord Capulet's rush to marry off Juliet

    ♦ Lord Capulet's threat to Juliet

    ♦ Juliet's morbid confession to Friar Laurence

    ♦ The purpose of the vial

    ♦ Juliet's request for forgiveness from her father

    ♦ Lord Capulet's praise for Friar Laurence

    ♦ Juliet's paranoia in regard to Friar Laurence's motives

    ♦ The burial vault

    ♦ The Nurse's terrible discovery

    ♦ Cancellation of the wedding

    ♦ Failure of Friar Laurence's plan

    ♦ Romeo's visit to the apothecary

    ♦ The apothecary's concern

    ♦ Friar Laurence and the quarantine

    ♦ Friar John's task

    ♦ Paris in the churchyard

    ♦ Balthasar's news

    ♦ Romeo's interaction with Paris

    ♦ Romeo's suicide

    ♦ Juliet's awakening

    ♦ Friar Laurence's upsetting news

    ♦ Juliet's method of suicide

    ♦ Lady Montague's death

    ♦ The resolution

    ♦ And more

    2. A Complete Set of Quizzes Organized by Act.

    All quizzes are in multiple choice format. A breakdown of each individual quiz follows:

    Act 1.

    This a 13-question quiz in multiple choice format and its answer key. Specifically, this quiz covers the following key plot details and concepts:

    ♦ The purpose of a chorus

    ♦ A character known as a peace-maker

    ♦ The reason for street-fighting in Verona

    ♦ Prince Escalus's declaration

    ♦ Romeo's cause for sadness

    ♦ Lord Capulet's attitude toward marrying off Juliet

    ♦ Benvolio's encouragement (to Romeo)

    ♦ Juliet's attitude toward marriage

    ♦ Mercutio's treatment of Romeo

    ♦ A foreshadowing fear

    ♦ Tybalt's temperament

    ♦ Lord Capulet's reaction to Romeo's presence at the party

    ♦ The revelation of Juliet's true identity

    Act 2.

    This is an 11-question quiz in multiple choice format and its answer key. Specifically, this quiz covers the following key plot details and concepts:

    ♦ Juliet's beauty and Romeo's metaphor

    ♦ The rejection of one's name

    ♦ Romeo's great fear, expressed during the balcony scene

    ♦ Juliet's concerns over acting to hastily

    ♦ Friar Laurence's specialty

    ♦ Friar Laurence's beliefs and philosophies

    ♦ Friar Laurence's thoughts regarding the union of Romeo & Juliet

    ♦ Tybalt's letter

    ♦ Offensive comments toward the Nurse

    ♦ The Nurse's news for Romeo

    ♦ Friar Laurence's assessment of Romeo & Juliet's love

    Act 3.

    This is an 14-question quiz in multiple choice format and its answer key. Specifically, this quiz covers the following key plot details and concepts:

    ♦ Mercutio's reason for fighting Tybalt

    ♦ Romeo's ill-fated attempt to stop the fight

    ♦ Romeo's reason for leaving Verona

    ♦ Juliet's criticisms of the Nurse

    ♦ The Nurse's confusing news

    ♦ Juliet's conflicting emotions toward her husband

    ♦ Friar Laurence's perspective on the Prince's punishment

    ♦ Romeo's erratic behavior

    ♦ Lord Capulet's arrangement with Paris

    ♦ Mantua

    ♦ A character who plans to have Romeo killed

    ♦ A threat of being disowned

    ♦ The Nurse's advice to Juliet

    ♦ Juliet's foreshadowing comments

    Act 4.

    This is an 10-question quiz in multiple choice format and its answer key. Specifically, this quiz covers the following key plot details and concepts:

    ♦ Paris's perspective on Lord Capulet's motivations

    ♦ Juliet's confession to Paris

    ♦ Paris's lack of awareness about Lord Capulet's threat

    ♦ Juliet's confession to Frair Laurence

    ♦ Friar Laurence's plan

    ♦ Juliet's request for her father's forgiveness

    ♦ Lord Capulet's attitude toward Friar Laurence

    ♦ A terrible thought in Juliet's mind

    ♦ An alarming discovery

    ♦ A shift in Lord Capulet's emotions

    Act 5.

    This is an 11-question quiz in multiple choice format and its answer key. Specifically, this quiz covers the following key plot details and concepts:

    ♦ Friar John's task

    ♦ The reason Friar John cannot complete his task

    ♦ Balthasar's significance

    ♦ Balthasar's lack of awareness

    ♦ A visit to the apothecary

    ♦ A conflict between Romeo and Paris in the churchyard

    ♦ Romeo's suicide

    ♦ Juliet's suicide

    ♦ Friar Laurence's emotional reaction

    ♦ The resolution

    3. A Comprehensive Unit Test & Key.

    This zip file contains three Word documents. The first is a detailed study guide outlining test content. The second is a clean copy of the assessment. The third is an answer key, which includes sample responses to short answer and essay questions.

    The test covers the entirety of the play: Act 1,Act 2,Act 3,Act 4, and Act 5. It is structured as follows:

    Part 1: Elements of Drama.

    10 questions. Multiple Choice.

    ♦ Definition of drama

    ♦ Definition of aside

    ♦ Definition of monologue

    ♦ Definition of act

    ♦ Definition of soliloquy

    ♦ Definition of playwright

    ♦ Definition of blocking

    ♦ Division of the stage into 9 parts

    ♦ The format of a sonnet

    ♦ Definition of spectacle

    Part 2: History of Drama.

    10 questions. True/False.

    ♦ Typical number of acts in a play

    ♦ Origins of drama

    ♦ The significance of Aeschylus

    ♦ Arena stages

    ♦ Shakespeare's three primary types of plays

    ♦ The Globe as the first permanent theatre

    ♦ Exclusion of females from the stage

    ♦ Spectators inside the Globe Theatre

    ♦ Daytime performances

    ♦ Unruly behavior among groundlings

    Part 3: Romeo & Juliet Characters.

    24 questions. Multiple Choice.

    ♦ Friar Laurence

    ♦ Prince Escalus

    ♦ Lord Capulet

    ♦ Lady Capulet

    ♦ Paris

    ♦ Mercutio

    ♦ The Nurse

    ♦ Romeo

    ♦ Juliet

    ♦ Tybalt

    ♦ Benvolio

    ♦ Balthasar

    ♦ Lord Montague

    ♦ Lady Montague

    ♦ Friar John

    Part 4: Literary Devices.

    10 questions. Multiple Choice.

    ♦ Oxymoron

    ♦ Verbal irony

    ♦ Dramatic irony

    ♦ Situational irony

    ♦ Hyperbole

    ♦ Internal conflict

    ♦ Metaphor

    ♦ Theme

    ♦ Personification

    ♦ Foreshadowing

    ♦ And more

    Part 5: Romeo & Juliet Quotes and Excerpts.

    14 questions. Matching quote to speaker and context.

    ♦ “Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much…”

    ♦ “But soft! What light through yonder window breaks…”

    ♦ “...thou art a villain.”

    ♦ “Ask for me tomorrow and you shall find me a grave man.”

    ♦ “Condemned villain, I do apprehend thee…”

    ♦ “O churl! Drunk all, and left no friendly drop…”

    ♦ “I do but keep the peace…”

    ♦ “My child is yet a stranger in the world…”

    ♦ “O, I am fortune’s fool.”

    ♦ “This intrusion shall, now seeming sweet…”

    ♦ “...hang, beg, starve, die in the streets…”

    ♦ “Capulet! Montague! ...all are punished.”

    ♦ “Parting is such sweet sorrow…”

    ♦ “For this alliance may so happy prove to turn your household’s rancor to pure love.”

    Part 6: Short Answer.

    8 questions.

    ♦ Purpose of a chorus

    ♦ Marriage in Shakespeare's day

    ♦ Romeo's emotional swings

    ♦ Romeo's willingness to renounce his name

    ♦ The balcony scene

    ♦ Juliet's feelings toward marrying Paris

    ♦ Theme

    ♦ Juliet's death

    Part 7: Essay.

    3 total essays. Students choose 2.

    ♦ Lady Capulet's relationship to Juliet and her attempts to convince Juliet to marry Paris

    ♦ Tragic mistakes and how they could have been avoided

    ♦ Determining who is to blame for Romeo and Juliet's death and why/how

    4. Close Reading Worksheet(s)

    Prologue Close Read

    This close reading resource helps students derive deeper meaning from the prologue of Romeo & Juliet by William Shakespeare. By engaging in this exercise, students will analyze the author's choices related to text structure, use context to define vocabulary and discern meaning in unfamiliar phrases, and more. Featuring 6 multiple choice questions and 3 constructed response questions, this editable resource includes an answer key and covers the following:

    • Discern meaning: "Two households, both alike in dignity..."
    • Defining vocabulary in context: mutiny.
    • Discerning meaning: "Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean."
    • Identifying historical context: the public's perception of astrology and Shakespeare's use of the phrase "star-crossed lovers."
    • Defining vocabulary in context: strife.
    • Discerning meaning: "What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend."
    • Analyzing author's choice: the purpose of a chorus.
    • Drawing inferences: the effect of knowing the outcome on the audience.
    • Characterizing relationships: "From ancient grudge break to new mutiny..."

    Act 1, Scene 1 Close Read

    This editable 13-question close reading resource helps students derive deeper meaning from Act 1, Scene 1 of Romeo & Juliet by William Shakespeare. By engaging in this exercise, students will determine figurative meanings, indicate author's intent, apply literary devices, define vocabulary in context, analyze character motivations, and more. An answer key is included. More specifically, this resource covers the following:

    • Discerning meaning: "We'll not carry coals."
    • Discerning meaning: "...not quickly moved."
    • Indicating author's intent: the effect of Sampson and Gregory's dialogue.
    • Analyzing character motivations: why Sampson takes back his thumb-biting gesture.
    • Drawing inferences: the conflict between the Capulets and the Montagues.
    • Analyzing character motivations: Gregory's change in attitude toward fighting.
    • Analyzing character: Benvolio's preference for peace.
    • Isolating accurate statements: the characterization of Lady Capulet and Lady Montague vs. the characterization of their husbands.
    • Defining vocabulary in context: pernicious.
    • Applying literary devices: foreshadowing.
    • Indicating character's intent: Benvolio's conversation with Romeo.
    • Drawing inferences: Romeo's conflicting messages.
    • Isolating accurate statements: Rosaline's motivation for leaving Romeo.

    Act 1, Scene 2 Close Read

    This editable 9-question close reading resource helps students derive deeper meaning from Act 1, Scene 2 of Romeo & Juliet by William Shakespeare. By engaging in this exercise, students will apply literary devices, define vocabulary in context, analyze character motivations, isolate accurate statements from inaccurate ones, and more. An answer key is included. More specifically, this resource covers the following:

    • Defining vocabulary in context: "Montague is bound as well as I..."
    • Isolating accurate statements: Paris's desire to receive Capulet's blessing in asking permission to marry Juliet.
    • Isolating accurate statements: Capulet's preference to wait two years before agreeing to marry off his daughter.
    • Discerning meaning from uncommon phrases: "woo her."
    • Applying literary devices: situational irony.
    • Interpreting figurative expressions: "One fire burns out another's burning."
    • Applying literary devices: dramatic irony.
    • Identifying character motivations: why Romeo intends to go to the party.
    • Interpreting figurative expressions: "I will make thee think thy swan a crow."

    Act 1, Scene 3 Close Read

    This editable 9-question close reading resource helps students derive deeper meaning from Act 1, Scene 3 of Romeo & Juliet by William Shakespeare. By engaging in this exercise, students will read to identify what the text says explicitly and implicitly, apply literary devices, analyze character, interpret figurative expressions, isolate accurate statements from inaccurate ones, and more. An answer key is included. More specifically, this resource covers the following:

    • Identifying what the text says explicitly and implicitly: Juliet's age.
    • Identifying what the text says explicitly and implicitly: what happened to the nurse's daughter.
    • Identifying textual evidence in support of a claim: the close bond between Juliet and the nurse.
    • Analyzing character: the nurse's brand of humor.
    • Identifying what the text says explicitly and implicitly: Lady Capulet's age.
    • Interpreting figurative expressions: "Why he's a man of wax."
    • Applying literary devices: metaphor.
    • Analyzing character: what Lady Capulet means when she tells Juliet, "And what obscured in this fair volume lies / Find written in the margent of his eyes."
    • Analyzing character: Juliet's reaction to her mother's request to return Paris's affections.

    Act 1, Scene 4 Close Read

    This editable 8-question close reading resource helps students derive deeper meaning from Act 1, Scene 4, of Romeo & Juliet by William Shakespeare. By engaging in this exercise, students will read to identify what the text says explicitly and implicitly, apply literary devices, analyze character, interpret figurative expressions, isolate accurate statements from inaccurate ones, and more. An answer key is included. More specifically, this resource covers the following:

    • Identifying puns: heavy/light; soles/soul; sore/soar.
    • Analyzing character: Mercutio's mocking attitude.
    • Interpreting uncommon phrases: "Betake him to his legs."
    • Interpreting uncommon phrases: "We burn daylight."
    • Applying literary devices: allusion (Queen Mab).
    • Analyzing character: Mercutio's active imagination.
    • Understanding character intent: what Mercutio wants Romeo to know about dreams.
    • Citing evidence in support of claims: "My mind misgives some consequence, yet hanging in the stars..." as an example of foreshadowing.

    Act 1, Scene 5 Close Read

    This editable 11-question close reading resource helps students derive deeper meaning from Act 1, Scene 5, of Romeo & Juliet by William Shakespeare. By engaging in this exercise, students will read to identify what the text says explicitly and implicitly, apply literary devices, analyze character, interpret figurative expressions, define unfamiliar vocabulary in context, and more. An answer key is included. More specifically, this resource covers the following:

    • Citing textual evidence in support of claims: "O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!"
    • Applying literary devices: simile.
    • Applying literary devices: situational irony.
    • Interpreting unfamiliar phrases: "an antic face."
    • Defining unfamiliar vocabulary in context: fleer.
    • Analyzing character motivations: Tybalt's desire to see Romeo dead.
    • Discerning the significance of textual details: Lord Capulet's comment that "I would not for the wealth of all this town / Here in my house do him disparagement."
    • Applying literary devices: foreshadowing.
    • Analyzing author's choices: the use of metaphor to indicate the intensity of Romeo and Juliet's feelings toward each other.
    • Applying literary devices: onomatopoeia.
    • Analyzing author's choices: the use of paradoxical language to indicate a theme relating to love.
    Total Pages
    105 pages
    Answer Key
    Included
    Teaching Duration
    1 month
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