Roy Lichtenstein - Pop Art - Modern Art History - Popart - 209 Slides

Roy Lichtenstein - Pop Art - Modern Art History - Popart - 209 Slides
Roy Lichtenstein - Pop Art - Modern Art History - Popart - 209 Slides
Roy Lichtenstein - Pop Art - Modern Art History - Popart - 209 Slides
Roy Lichtenstein - Pop Art - Modern Art History - Popart - 209 Slides
Roy Lichtenstein - Pop Art - Modern Art History - Popart - 209 Slides
Roy Lichtenstein - Pop Art - Modern Art History - Popart - 209 Slides
Roy Lichtenstein - Pop Art - Modern Art History - Popart - 209 Slides
Roy Lichtenstein - Pop Art - Modern Art History - Popart - 209 Slides
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This is a complete presentation on artist Roy Lichtenstein in Pop Art THERE ARE MANY ACTUAL SLIDES FOR YOUR REVIEW IN THE PREVIEW. THIS IS YOUR BEST INDICATION OF PRODUCT QUALITY.

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EXCERPT: LICHTENSTEIN AND IMAGE APPROPRIATION
Before the Pop artists, no artist had appropriated images from someone else and used them as the basis for his own art. Lichtenstein, just like Rauschenberg and Warhol, appropriated others’ images as the basis for his art work. Before Pop Art, this was unthinkable for a fine artist to do. Rauschenberg and Warhol began taking their own photographs after awhile to use as the basis of their art. Lichtenstein never screenprinted photographs into his art.

Dorothy Lichtenstein, his widow, said, "It was actually great going to a museum with Roy. Everything was grist for his mind. He was always looking at paintings and how he might be able to transform them."

This image appropriation also raises legal issues, such as compensation to the original artist for use of his image if it is not in the public domain. No such issue arises, however, if just a similar idea is being used. If the idea is so transformed as to be a new idea, no compensation is required. Lichtenstein did not credit, pay any royalties to, or seek permission from the original artists or copyright holders on the comic images. He believed he had transformed the images. This remains a contentious issue to this day.

EXCERPT: PAINTING, "OHH, ALRIGHT"
Lichtenstein leaves it up to viewers to decide what transpired in this phone call.

National Gallery curator Harry Cooper said, ”What I like about it is the way she's holding the phone. She's caressing the phone, and I think in a way she would rather have a relationship with the receiver than with whomever is on the other end of the line."

EXCERPT: SECOND COMIC WAVE
1994. Lichtenstein took up with his comic women one more time. This time they were were altered more. If a woman was previously crying over some man, in this incarnation she was instead thinking in silence with her eyes closed. Perhaps the intervening women’s movement had some effect on his imagery. The romantic women’s comics he’d used in the early 1960s no longer existed by the 1990s.

Holland Cotter summed up Lichtenstein’s career, writing for "The New York Times", “His work looks like no one else’s, and some of it still feels fresh and audacious. He encapsulates, at least in his early work, the spirit of an era. He is embedded in the culture now, and unlikely to be dislodged.”
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