SCIENTIFIC NOTATION Word Problems - Error Analysis (Find the Error)

SCIENTIFIC NOTATION Word Problems -  Error Analysis  (Find the Error)
SCIENTIFIC NOTATION Word Problems -  Error Analysis  (Find the Error)
SCIENTIFIC NOTATION Word Problems -  Error Analysis  (Find the Error)
SCIENTIFIC NOTATION Word Problems -  Error Analysis  (Find the Error)
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(985 KB|14 pages)
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  1. SCIENTIFIC NOTATION BUNDLE - Task Cards, Error Analysis, Graphic Organizers, Maze, Riddle, Coloring Activity This BUNDLE includes 40 task cards, 10 error analysis activities and 10 problem solving graphic organizers, 1 maze, 1 riddle, 1 color by number activity (over 90 skills practice and real-wo
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  2. Great for online learning and distance learning!Have your students apply their understanding of math concepts with these 8th Grade ERROR ANALYSIS activities. This BUNDLE resource includes 70 questions (7 sets/10 questions per set) of Common Core WORD PROBLEMS that are solved incorrectly. Students
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    $16.80
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  3. - Great for online learning and distance learning!This middle school ERROR ANALYSIS BUNDLE includes 230 real-world word problems (23 sets) that are solved incorrectly for grades 6-8. Students have to IDENTIFY THE ERROR, provide the CORRECT SOLUTION and share a helpful STRATEGY for solving the proble
    $69.00
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  • Product Description
  • Standards

- Great for online learning and distance learning!

Have your students apply their understanding of SCIENTIFIC NOTATION with this ERROR ANALYSIS activity. It includes 10 real-world WORD PROBLEMS that are solved incorrectly. Students have to IDENTIFY THE ERROR, provide the CORRECT SOLUTION, and share a helpful STRATEGY for solving the problem. An ANSWER KEY has also been provided with examples of possible answers.

Giving students opportunities to identify and correct errors in presented solutions allow them to show their understanding of the mathematical concepts you have taught. When I present this activity to my students, I tell them that these are errors that students from my other class made and I need their help to correct them. Students LOVE correcting other students' mistakes.

This activity perfect for CLASSWORK, HOMEWORK, MATH CENTERS, and PAIR/GROUP WORK. Be sure to download the sample for a full overview of what you get.

Topics included:

✔ Scientific Notation

✔ Comparing Numbers in Scientific Notation

✔ Multiplication & Division with Scientific Notation

✔ Addition & Subtractions with Scientific Notation

Teaching Tip:

This resource works well with my Digital Scientific Notation Google Quiz (perfect for distance / remote learning).

Common Core Alignment :

* 8.EE.3 - Use numbers expressed in the form of a single digit times an integer power of 10 to estimate very large or very small quantities, and to express how many times as much one is than the other.

* 8.EE.4 - Perform operations with numbers expressed in scientific notation, including problems where both decimal and scientific notation are used.

* MP3 - Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

This resource is included in my Scientific Notation UNIT RESOURCE BUNDLE!

More SCIENTIFIC NOTATION Resources:

* Scientific Notation PROBLEM SOLVING GRAPHIC ORGANIZER

* Scientific Notation ERROR ANALYSIS

* Scientific Notation TASK CARDS

* Scientific Notation MAZE, RIDDLE & COLORING PAGE

More 8TH GRADE review:

* 8th Grade Daily/Weekly REVIEW

* 8th Grade ERROR ANALYSIS BUNDLE

* 8th Grade Winter MATH PACKET

* 8th Grade WORD PROBLEMS WITH GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS BUNDLE

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Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and-if there is a flaw in an argument-explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.
Perform operations with numbers expressed in scientific notation, including problems where both decimal and scientific notation are used. Use scientific notation and choose units of appropriate size for measurements of very large or very small quantities (e.g., use millimeters per year for seafloor spreading). Interpret scientific notation that has been generated by technology.
Use numbers expressed in the form of a single digit times an integer power of 10 to estimate very large or very small quantities, and to express how many times as much one is than the other. For example, estimate the population of the United States as 3 × 10⁸ and the population of the world as 7 × 10⁹, and determine that the world population is more than 20 times larger.
Total Pages
14 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
45 minutes
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