STAAR/ EOC: Expository Essay Unit

STAAR/ EOC: Expository Essay Unit
STAAR/ EOC: Expository Essay Unit
STAAR/ EOC: Expository Essay Unit
STAAR/ EOC: Expository Essay Unit
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This is a 3 week STAAR expository essay unit, although it would work well with any expository essay unit. This unit has been used with ESL students and with students who have failed the test and needed a more intense and scaffolded approach to the essay. The entire unit is progressive, working with 8 prompts that the class and students use to build their essay. Each lesson can be modified easily based on your students' needs and each lesson has a brief explanation of how it was presented in my classroom.

*Please also look at the Preview*

* STAAR Short Answer Response also available on my page!*

Day 1: The PowerPoint notes (22 slides) will explain what the expository essay is for STAAR and the criteria for the points. The PowerPoint goes over the writing process and builds an essay from the writing process. Process is color coded so students can see how the steps look in the completed essay.

Day 2: Students look at two real prompts and identify the main idea they are to write about, and begin brainstorming the direction of their essay. 3 different brainstorming/organizing layouts are available for students to use. I model the first prompt and students work in pairs on the second prompt.

Day 3: Students continue to work on identifying the main idea and brainstorming with the 2nd and 3rd prompts. I will display good examples of pair work at the beginning of class and then students will work individually on one of the two new prompts.

Day 4: Students take notes on Thesis PowerPoint (10 slides). As a class, we complete three examples at the end of the power point. Students work in pairs on creating thesis statements on the worksheet that has 10 different prompts. For homework, students write 2 thesis statements for the previous prompts used in brainstorming.

Day 5: Students watch a video on how to write a hook. These videos are linked in the PowerPoint. As a class, we write an introduction to the first two prompts that we brainstormed. Then in pairs, students write an introduction to the other two prompts they brainstormed. I teach my students, "Imagine..." statements as a hook if they can not think of anything else. Share some of the introductions in class. Look over the hook and the thesis. Make corrections or point out positives as needed.

Day 6: Students will start writing the body. I explain the importance of having a good brainstorming outline to use. I take these out and we look at how our ideas become our body. Then I talk about how the body must have good supporting details. Student complete a gallery walk where they write supporting details for 3 different topic sentences. We share their answers in class.

Day 7: As a class, we write a body for one of the prompts we originally brainstormed. Then in pairs, students write the body for the second prompt.

Day 8: Students write the body for one of the 2 prompts they have brainstormed individually.

Day 9: Students conference with teacher on the body of their essay and take the comments to write a body on the 2nd prompt.

Day 10: Teacher leads students in writing a conclusion for their essay on the first two prompts they brainstormed as a class. Students then write conclusions for both their essays that they have written on their own.

Day 11: Teacher uses released student examples (I don't have as they are copyrighted by TEA, but I do provide the link where you can download them) and as a class, students assess the essay as a whole going back to the point system that was explained in the first PowerPoint. First 5 are assessed as a class, students then work in groups where they assess 3 and class discusses. Students assess 2 individually.

Day 12: Student writes an entire essay, choosing between two prompts. While students write, teacher conferences with students on the bodies they wrote for their essays and students use comments to better their current essay.

Day 13: Student writes an entire essay, given one prompt.

Day 14: Students take two draft essays and go back to edit their essays. Students are given a check-list to go over. Students must record on each essay at least 10 different revisions. This can be adding transition words, changing spelling, adding commas, fixing run-on sentences, or changing out words for stronger words.

Day 15: Student practices writing one final essay with a prompt given by the teacher.

STAAR EOC Expository Essay by Paige Vetter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Total Pages
60
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
3 Weeks

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STAAR/ EOC: Expository Essay Unit
STAAR/ EOC: Expository Essay Unit
STAAR/ EOC: Expository Essay Unit
STAAR/ EOC: Expository Essay Unit