Secret of the Wild Child (Genie) Developmental Psychology, Language, Chomsky

Secret of the Wild Child (Genie) Developmental Psychology, Language, Chomsky
Secret of the Wild Child (Genie) Developmental Psychology, Language, Chomsky
Secret of the Wild Child (Genie) Developmental Psychology, Language, Chomsky
Secret of the Wild Child (Genie) Developmental Psychology, Language, Chomsky
Secret of the Wild Child (Genie) Developmental Psychology, Language, Chomsky
Secret of the Wild Child (Genie) Developmental Psychology, Language, Chomsky
Secret of the Wild Child (Genie) Developmental Psychology, Language, Chomsky
Secret of the Wild Child (Genie) Developmental Psychology, Language, Chomsky
Subject
Grade Levels
Resource Type
Product Rating
4.0
1 rating
File Type

PDF (Acrobat) Document File

Be sure that you have an application to open this file type before downloading and/or purchasing.

440 KB|4 pages
Share
Product Description
The story of Genie could be shown to students in the learning unit, developmental unit, or even in the social psychology unit. Her story portrays what it is like for a child to grow up in an abusive environment and the consequences of such. This is perfect for a lesson on language development so I also show it to my Anthropology students when assessing the Linguistic Anthropological subfield.


From Nova:
"In the fall of 1970, social workers took custody of a 13-year-old child who had spent much of her life chained to a potty chair in her bedroom. She could not speak, walk, or respond to other people. She was called "Genie." Her case attracted psychologists who were interested in finding out whether she could still learn to speak. At the time, some linguists, led by MIT's Noam Chomsky, believed that human speech is a genetically programmed ability. Eric Lenneberg, a neuropsychologist, agreed with Chomsky and added further that if a person did not learn to speak by adolescence, then the natural ability to learn language might be lost forever. This theory was the so-called "critical period hypothesis."


Although Genie's situation was one that scientists would never create intentionally to test their theories, her unfortunate circumstances made her a prime candidate for experimentation. Genie was past puberty. If she could still learn language, it would cast doubt on the critical period hypothesis. Ultimately, Genie's caretakers were criticized for combining their research with her treatment."

Image from: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/0a/d5/98/0ad5989f2976874450c1c7ae2a8b08a0.jpg or https://www.pinterest.com/explore/wild-child-movie/
Total Pages
4 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
1 hour
Report this Resource
Loading...
$3.30
Digital Download
Product Thumbnail
$0.00
Product Thumbnail
$0.00
Product Thumbnail
$0.00
Product Thumbnail
$0.00
Product Thumbnail
$0.00
$3.30
Digital Download
Teachers Pay Teachers

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

Learn More

Keep in Touch!

Sign up