Selma, 1965 Voting Rights Act & Civil Rights Since the Shelby, AL Court Case

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2.6 MB   |   16 pages

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

This year (2015) is the 50th Anniversary of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, and the Selma March on Bloody Sunday (March 7, 1965) portrayed in the new movie "Selma". This unit is an interactive 16 slide Power Point presentation (written in Power Point 2013) about the history of the Voting Rights Act of 1965; the Civil Rights March of Bloody Sunday in Selma, Alabama March 7, 1965; and the 2013 U.S. Supreme Court decision Shelby, AL v Holder.

The Shelby case ruled section 5, (the coverage area formula from the 1960s) illegal, until Congress redraws it, allowing states to propose and pass laws limiting access to the ballot box, which would have formerly been illegal.

It examines actions of 33+ states to pass laws restricting access to voting (ID requirements, shorter early voting, eliminating early pre registration for 16-17 year old Americans, and requiring citizenship documentation). In 2013 ninety-two restricting voting bills were proposed in states nation-wide. States including, AR, IN, MT, NE, NC, ND, TN, and VA passed such laws. In 2014 such laws have been proposed in thirty-three states.

Many of these laws have been used in states controlled by Republican Governors/legislatures for political party advantage, disproportionately limiting Democratic party voters' constitutional ability to vote. Academic research shows these laws overwhelming have negative impacts on African-Americans (especially the "Souls to the Polls" early voting of the NAACP and Black Churches), on poorer Americans, legal immigrant U.S. citizens, and students.

This power point presentation has three embedded video URLs (totally 16 minutes) used with permissions. When you click on the image, it links you to the URL and plays the videos. They include video of "Bloody Sunday" (tonystallings.net), of President Lydon B. Johnson's March 15, 1965 speech to Congress promoting the Act, and 2010 remarks from the U.S. House of Representatives, by current Georgia Representative John Lewis, a co-leader of the Bloody Sunday march, and key aide to Dr. Martin Luther King, reflecting on the significance of "Bloody Sunday" and the Voting Rights Act 45 years later.

This presentation gives your students background, facts, both historical and contemporary efforts to 'restrict' the vote, but it also allows them to 'step into history' to feel, see, and hear the key events of the civil rights struggle for voting rights.

IF you have any difficulty accessing the video embeds, be sure to run the power point show, as they don't show in view only mode.

UPDATED ********* Feb 6, 2015 -- I have added three additional slides, those with URLs to the embedded videos in the original presentation, which failed to 'run' on some systems, for filter, security issues. These three slides should make it possible for any adopter to see and present the three videos.

IF you have any difficulty, please let me know. I want these to work for you and your students.

Thank you,

Pasion4Learning
Total Pages
16
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
90 Minutes

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Selma, 1965 Voting Rights Act & Civil Rights Since the She
Selma, 1965 Voting Rights Act & Civil Rights Since the She
Selma, 1965 Voting Rights Act & Civil Rights Since the She
Selma, 1965 Voting Rights Act & Civil Rights Since the She