Shake & Spill Fact Family Work Mat

Shake & Spill Fact Family Work Mat
Shake & Spill Fact Family Work Mat
Shake & Spill Fact Family Work Mat
Shake & Spill Fact Family Work Mat
File Type

PDF

(149 KB|2 pages)
Standards
Also included in:
  1. 45% off on all of my work mats when you purchase this bundle!Bonus Work Mats INCLUDED! (10 pages no where else in my store)Can be used with whole group, small group, or centers. Made to be easily differentiated, and student-led. Print on colored card-stock, laminate or place in a clear plastic sleev
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  • Product Description
  • Standards

Use whole group, small group, or in centers.

Print on color card-stock, laminate or place in a clear plastic sleeve. Students use dry erase marker.

Students shake a container of red/yellow counters. They spill them onto the work mat in the largest circle. They count them and write the number in the correct space in the number sentence. They sort the yellow and red in the two spaces, count them, and write the number in the correct space in the number sentence.

Write, wipe, and play again and again!

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Look for and make use of structure. Mathematically proficient students look closely to discern a pattern or structure. Young students, for example, might notice that three and seven more is the same amount as seven and three more, or they may sort a collection of shapes according to how many sides the shapes have. Later, students will see 7 Γ— 8 equals the well remembered 7 Γ— 5 + 7 Γ— 3, in preparation for learning about the distributive property. In the expression π‘₯Β² + 9π‘₯ + 14, older students can see the 14 as 2 Γ— 7 and the 9 as 2 + 7. They recognize the significance of an existing line in a geometric figure and can use the strategy of drawing an auxiliary line for solving problems. They also can step back for an overview and shift perspective. They can see complicated things, such as some algebraic expressions, as single objects or as being composed of several objects. For example, they can see 5 – 3(π‘₯ – 𝑦)Β² as 5 minus a positive number times a square and use that to realize that its value cannot be more than 5 for any real numbers π‘₯ and 𝑦.
Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 - 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2.
Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).
Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)
Total Pages
2 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A
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