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Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Math Lesson Plan (Accountable Talk)

Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Math Lesson Plan (Accountable Talk)
Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Math Lesson Plan (Accountable Talk)
Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Math Lesson Plan (Accountable Talk)
Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Math Lesson Plan (Accountable Talk)
Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Math Lesson Plan (Accountable Talk)
Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Math Lesson Plan (Accountable Talk)
Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Math Lesson Plan (Accountable Talk)
Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Math Lesson Plan (Accountable Talk)
File Type

PDF

(187 KB|4 pages)
Product Rating
Standards
  • Product Description
  • StandardsNEW

Who: This Social Emotional Learning (SEL) mathematics lesson plan is effective for grades K-12, as it can be applied to discussion of any math problem. 

What: Through the incorporation of SEL, students can transform “you’re wrong!” into Accountable Talk by addressing sentence stems that can be used during classroom discussion. The teacher asks students to solve a problem, come up with multiple ways to show their solutions and discuss with their peers. The teacher then engages students in a discussion to evaluate how well how each approach worked in solving the problem. 

Where: This lesson plan can be used in any mathematics class and during any lesson.

When: This lesson plan is geared towards small group instruction and individual practice. It can be used at any point during the school year.

Why:The activity presented in the lesson plan is a good framework for promoting social awareness and relationship management skills.

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and-if there is a flaw in an argument-explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.
Total Pages
4 pages
Answer Key
Does not apply
Teaching Duration
N/A
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