Socratic Method | DIALECTICS | GOOGLE SLIDES

Linda Jennifer
1.3k Followers
Grade Levels
7th - 12th, Higher Education, Adult Education, Homeschool
Standards
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  • Google Apps™
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15 pages/18 slides/3 student handouts
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$6.00
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Linda Jennifer
1.3k Followers
Includes Google Apps™
The Teacher-Author indicated this resource includes assets from Google Workspace (e.g. docs, slides, etc.).

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Description

Socratic Method | DIALECTICS | GOOGLE SLIDES

****NEW GOOGLE SLIDES COMPONENT ADDED****

How are Socratic Circles related to dialectics? This product explains the Socratic Method while using an excerpt from a Socratic dialogue.

This is a self-contained product on The Socratic Method or dialectics (widely used in Colleges, Universities, and Law Schools) everything you need is here.

While many teachers use Socratic Circles or Socratic Seminars as a way to engage their students in higher order thinking skills, they do not teach the actual Socratic dialogues as they are difficult to teach to Middle School or High School students. This unit takes a very small section of Plato’s APOLOGY of Socrates and makes it accessible to younger students.

PLEASE READ THE NEWLY ADDED ADDENDUM TO HELP YOU STRUCTURE THESE FILES

INCLUDED IN THIS PRODUCT ARE THE FOLLOWING:

◼️ NEW!!! GOOGLE SLIDES INTERACTIVE COMPONENT.

IF YOUR STUDENTS ARE NOT USING COMPUTERS THEY MAY STILL DO THIS ASSIGNMENT. PRINT AND DISTRIBUTE OR USE WITH A SMART BOARD AND ENGAGE THE ENTIRE CLASS.

◼️A small excerpt from Plato’s Apology. This excerpt is a separate PDF in the zip file. It is also the last slide in the presentation.

◼️ A slide presentation on dialectics (ten slides). A PDF VERSION AND A GOOGLE SLIDES VERSION.

◼️ Group questions and individual questions. These are also included as separate PDF files.

◼️ Essay and/or discussion questions. THESE ARE NOW A GOOGLE SLIDES COMPONENT AND A PDF VERSION AS WELL.

◼️ Three pages of teacher notes (in the zip file) and a slide presentation with teacher notes included (four slides). THE LATTER IS NOW A GOOGLE SLIDES COMPONENT.

I use Google Classroom for all of my assignments. I create the assignment in Google slides or as a Google doc - I post the assignment and Classroom makes a copy of the file (for each student) - they simply hit “turn in” when they are ready to submit. It’s accessible anywhere through Google Chrome. It is their own file with their name on it. They may also share the file with you or with other students when they are doing group work.

This product is part of PERFECT PAIRING PRODUCT - see the link below for more information:

PERFECT PAIRING: SOCRATES AND THE INSANITY DEFENSE

If you found this product helpful you may also like the following:

DAILY DILEMMA ONE SHEET (#3)

What is Textual Analysis? The Republic

What is Textual Analysis? Tocqueville

Great Speeches #1 St. Crispin's Day Speech

The questions in this product are aligned with ELA-Literacy CCSS 8-12 - in particular with the following standards:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.1; 9-10.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.4; 9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1; W.11-12.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2; W11-12.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2; RI.11-12.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3 Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

Achieve positive results in creating analytical thinkers by nurturing your students’ abilities and giving them the necessary tools to develop critical reasoning skills. This can be achieved through close textual analysis of small sections of the Great Books.

The ELA Common Core State Standards require students to learn how to read texts carefully:

“As a natural outgrowth of meeting the charge to define college and career readiness, the Standards also lay out a vision of what it means to be a literate person in the twenty-first century. Indeed, the skills and understandings students are expected to demonstrate have wide applicability outside the classroom or workplace. Students who meet the Standards readily undertake the close, attentive reading that is at the heart of understanding and enjoying complex works of literature. They habitually perform the critical reading necessary to pick carefully through the staggering amount of information available today in print and digitally. They actively seek the wide, deep, and thoughtful engagement with high-quality literary and informational texts that builds knowledge, enlarges experience, and broadens worldviews. They reflexively demonstrate the cogent reasoning and use of evidence that is essential to both private deliberation and responsible citizenship in a democratic republic. In short, students who meet the Standards develop the skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening that are the foundation for any creative and purposeful expression in language.” English Language Arts Standards | Home | English Language Arts

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Total Pages
15 pages/18 slides/3 student handouts
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
Lifelong tool
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social studies.
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

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