Statistics Vocabulary : mean, mode, median, min, max, range

Statistics Vocabulary : mean, mode, median, min, max, range
Statistics Vocabulary : mean, mode, median, min, max, range
Statistics Vocabulary : mean, mode, median, min, max, range
Statistics Vocabulary : mean, mode, median, min, max, range
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PDF

(35 KB|2 pages)
Standards
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  • Standards

This one page worksheet reviews statistics vocabulary, especially those starting with the letter m - mean, mode, median, min, and max. This sheet is designed for more right-brainers and those struggling with remembering which word is which. It does not include any calculations but rather deals with definitions and processes, which is listed as "construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others" in the general standards. It can be used to help students figure out how to study for a basic stat test and how to check their work to see if their answers make sense.

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Attend to precision. Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.
Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and-if there is a flaw in an argument-explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.
Summarize numerical data sets in relation to their context, such as by:
Recognize that a measure of center for a numerical data set summarizes all of its values with a single number, while a measure of variation describes how its values vary with a single number.
Total Pages
2 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A
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