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Story Elements, Character Development, and Showing vs. Telling in Narratives

Story Elements, Character Development, and Showing vs. Telling in Narratives
Story Elements, Character Development, and Showing vs. Telling in Narratives
Story Elements, Character Development, and Showing vs. Telling in Narratives
Story Elements, Character Development, and Showing vs. Telling in Narratives
Story Elements, Character Development, and Showing vs. Telling in Narratives
Story Elements, Character Development, and Showing vs. Telling in Narratives
Story Elements, Character Development, and Showing vs. Telling in Narratives
Story Elements, Character Development, and Showing vs. Telling in Narratives
Product Description
When using this product in my classroom, I have typically started with a series of mini-lessons introducing students to the different types of conflict that can be found in narratives. In my class we focused on character vs. character, character vs. nature, character vs. society, character vs. self, and character vs. technology. While this could be structured differently, in the past I have read my students a picture book from each of the conflict types and had them help me identify the main character and the conflict faced by that individual in the story. I would next do a series of mini-lessons in which I introduced a traditional story-mountain and then had students help me fill in a story mountain for different books and movie-shorts. Finally, to launch our writing, students would brainstorm a problem they would be interested in tracing throughout the length of a narrative. They would come up with at least three ways to solve the problem in their story and then, students would peer-conference to hear ideas that others in a small group might have for ways to resolve the conflict. Once all students had a solid problem and solution and conferenced with a teacher, we began a set of mini-lessons in which students were introduced to different pages of the packet and filled them in before writing a draft. The last two pages of the document are revision pages in which students found "Telling" sections of their writing and worked to "Show" what was in their mind's eye. For example, instead of saying, "It was raining," they might say, "Drops of water began to fill the window so that I could hardly see out. Suddenly a crash of thunder as loud as a lion's roar pierced my ears and scared Homer, my puppy, making him run and hide under the couch." The character page can be used in a similar way for revision. If you want to show that your character is kind, you might show their actions. Instead of, "Sheryl was kind," you might say, "Every morning on her way to work, Sheryl stopped to buy a dog treat from the corner store to hand to the dog who passed his days resting outside the Dentist Office on Maple Street." Normally during revising I have my students put a star in their draft along with a number and then label their revising sheets the same way. That way, when they go to publish, they know they need to find their revising sheets and add in or change their content in a specific section. I hope you enjoy using this product as you take your students through their own writing journeys!
Total Pages
8 pages
Answer Key
Does not apply
Teaching Duration
2 Weeks
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$3.00
Digital Download
$3.00
Digital Download
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