Tangram Circles: Fractions, Geometry, Algebra, and a Generous Helping of Pi

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Teacher to Teacher Press
394 Followers
Grade Levels
7th - 10th, Homeschool
Standards
Resource Type
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
16 pages
$4.99
$4.99
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Description

If your students are working with pi and calculating the areas or circumferences of circles, this activity will give them plenty of practice. Students will use πr2 to calculate the areas of circles and regions within them. Each model progresses in complexity from simple to advanced. This can be used as an individual or team activity with upper middle school and high school students in regular education or more advanced students at lower grade levels. Students can even create their own circular designs using the included template for a culminating project.

Total Pages
16 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
1 Week
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, volume and surface area of two- and three-dimensional objects composed of triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, cubes, and right prisms.
Understand that a two-dimensional figure is congruent to another if the second can be obtained from the first by a sequence of rotations, reflections, and translations; given two congruent figures, describe a sequence that exhibits the congruence between them.
Understand that a two-dimensional figure is similar to another if the second can be obtained from the first by a sequence of rotations, reflections, translations, and dilations; given two similar two-dimensional figures, describe a sequence that exhibits the similarity between them.
Use informal arguments to establish facts about the angle sum and exterior angle of triangles, about the angles created when parallel lines are cut by a transversal, and the angle-angle criterion for similarity of triangles. For example, arrange three copies of the same triangle so that the sum of the three angles appears to form a line, and give an argument in terms of transversals why this is so.
Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to determine unknown side lengths in right triangles in real-world and mathematical problems in two and three dimensions.

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