Whoops! Something went wrong.

Click here to refresh the page

Task Completion and Reward Charts

Task Completion and Reward Charts
Task Completion and Reward Charts
Task Completion and Reward Charts
Task Completion and Reward Charts
Task Completion and Reward Charts
Task Completion and Reward Charts
Task Completion and Reward Charts
Grade Levels
Resource Type
Product Rating
File Type

PDF (Acrobat) Document File

Be sure that you have an application to open this file type before downloading and/or purchasing.

138 KB|9 pages
Product Description
When I worked in a classroom with students with behavioral disorders and in guided study halls, this sheet was a motivational lifesaver! However, I do believe it will work well in variety of settings where independent work is expected - including the home!

In the first set, students are asked to complete five tasks before earning a predetermined reward. In the next set, students are asked to complete four tasks before earning a reward. Finally, in the third set, students are asked to complete three tasks before earning an award.

When using this sheet, I sat down with each student and determined what work needed to be completed for that day. We wrote everything down in the order it needed to be completed, then transferred it to this chart. Students were given a menu of rewards from which they could choose their three rewards for the day. In addition, whatever wasn't completed, was already prepared to be added to the next day's sheet.

Other ways to use this include allowing students the order in which they complete the activities within a given set or to use it as a homework completion chart. Each set of activities can be color coded so students know they have to complete all "red" activities first, for example.

Homeschooling families and tutors will also appreciate this sheet for recordkeeping purposes and to help keep students on task.

Consider folding or cutting the sheet into sections to make the workload appear more manageable for your learners.

Use this sheet to track which rewards are most effective for your students. You could consider coding the rewards by effectiveness. For example, you might highlight rewards in pink that were highly motivating, rewards that were semi-effective in yellow, and rewards that were not motivating in blue. You may also consider highlighting by the type of reward. For instance, tangible rewards may be highlighted in pink, avoidance/escape rewards in yellow, attention awards in blue, and sensory awards in green. These could be charted in another location, such as an IEP, or simply on the back of each day’s sheet.

If desired, indicate on this sheet the time it took to complete each task. You may also want to make notes about how many prompts/reminders it took to get the student to complete a task or which tasks were exceptionally difficult or required more supervision and assistance than expected. You can design a color coding system for this as well.
Total Pages
9 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
Report Copyright Infringement
  • Comments & Ratings
  • Product Q & A
Loading...
$3.00
Digital Download
Add one to cart

Advertisement

Advertisement

$3.00
Digital Download
Add one to cart
Teachers Pay Teachers

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

Learn More

Keep in Touch!

Sign up