Test - Unit 2 - Organizing Matter

Test - Unit 2 - Organizing Matter
Test - Unit 2 - Organizing Matter
Test - Unit 2 - Organizing Matter
Test - Unit 2 - Organizing Matter
Test - Unit 2 - Organizing Matter
Test - Unit 2 - Organizing Matter
Test - Unit 2 - Organizing Matter
Test - Unit 2 - Organizing Matter
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The following content is assessed on this test:
C3. I can distinguish between pure substances (elements and compounds) and mixtures:
I can identify and differentiate between elements and compounds using chemical formulas.
I can use chemical formulas to indicate the phase of a substance (solid, liquid, or gas)
I can use chemical formulas to indicate that a substance is dissolved in water and I can explain why such a substance is considered a mixture rather than a pure substance.

C4. I can distinguish between chemical and physical changes.

C5. I can identify information and patterns in the organization of the periodic table:
I can use the periodic table to identify three classes of elements: metals, nonmetals, and metalloids.
I can explain the relationship between an element’s position on the periodic table and its atomic number.
I can identify groups and periods on the periodic table.
I can identify patterns for how substances are organized by their properties, which include reactivity, size of atoms, and softness.

C6. I recognize that the model of the atom has changed over time as new evidence has arisen to support or change the model:
I can describe the important discoveries of Dalton, Thomson, Rutherford, Bohr, and Schrodinger.
I can identify and describe the relative size, charge, and location of the subatomic particles in an atom (protons, neutrons, and electrons).
I can draw and label a Bohr model of an atom, placing the correct number of electrons in the correct shells or energy levels.

C7. I recognize that not all atoms of an element are exactly the same.
I can define isotope and write isotope symbols for atoms.
I can calculate the number of neutrons in an atom given its atomic mass (also called mass number).
I can explain what the average atomic mass of an element is and calculate it.
I can predict the most abundant isotope of an element using the average atomic mass.


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11 pages
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