Thanksgiving Logic Puzzles for Kindergarten and First Grade!

Thanksgiving Logic Puzzles for Kindergarten and First Grade!
Thanksgiving Logic Puzzles for Kindergarten and First Grade!
Thanksgiving Logic Puzzles for Kindergarten and First Grade!
Thanksgiving Logic Puzzles for Kindergarten and First Grade!
Thanksgiving Logic Puzzles for Kindergarten and First Grade!
Thanksgiving Logic Puzzles for Kindergarten and First Grade!
Thanksgiving Logic Puzzles for Kindergarten and First Grade!
Thanksgiving Logic Puzzles for Kindergarten and First Grade!
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(18 MB|28 pages)
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  1. 20 Logic Puzzles for Kindergarten and First Grade! They are large, easily visible puzzles for whole groups or small groups. I usually create logic puzzles for grades 2 and up that require reading. I tried to think of a way to bring these puzzles, which are excellent for critical thinking skills, t
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Critical Thinking for Kindergarten and First Grade!

Included in this file are 5 logic puzzles made specifically for kindergarten and first graders. They are large, easily visible puzzles for whole groups or small groups. I usually create logic puzzles for grades 2 and up that require reading. I tried to think of a way to bring these puzzles, which are excellent for critical thinking skills, to younger children who may not be reading. The teacher should set up the puzzle as shown in the picture I took. I have magnets on the pictures and drew the lines on the white board. You could also set this up on the floor and use tape to create the grid lines or you can tape 3 large pieces of construction paper together and draw the grid lines on the paper. This can be saved for future use.

Each of the five puzzles are labeled with their own letter so you won't mix up puzzle pieces. For example, I've labeled all the pieces for the first puzzle with the letter "A." When you have completed that puzzle with your students, pick up the pieces and grab the pieces for the "B" puzzle. You only have to lay out the 8 pictures as shown and read the clues (also labeled) that go with that puzzle. I've made this as teacher friendly as I could! Answer sheets included!

Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and-if there is a flaw in an argument-explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.
Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, "Does this make sense?" They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
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