The Flying Carpet 100 Chart ******* Not Your Standard 100 Chart

The Flying Carpet 100 Chart ******* Not Your Standard 100 Chart
The Flying Carpet 100 Chart ******* Not Your Standard 100 Chart
The Flying Carpet 100 Chart ******* Not Your Standard 100 Chart
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0.03 MB   |   3 pages

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We're all familiar with the conventional 100 chart, but it's good to think outside the box. The traditional 100 chart does not have a zero, something that Indian and Arab mathematicians realized was essential long before Europeans did. Also, the traditional 100 chart puts the most familiar numbers at the farthest distance from the reader (according to top-down, left-right reading conventions). This 100 chart helps to lift future mathematicians, like giving them a flying carpet to learn on.

This product includes an alternative 100 chart and two worksheets. One worksheet is nearly blank and the other allows for scaffolding (using notes on the worksheet that provide hints). Each worksheet could be used independently of the non-standard 100 chart. By making the number zero the origin point, this 100 chart format makes the symbolic mechanics of place in numerals transparent for children to understand.

In addition, the scaffolding worksheet helps future mathematicians understand how to say the names of numbers. On the scaffolding worksheet, the boxes for numerals 11-19 are turned at an angle because their names can be confusing to learners. Smaller numerals at the top-left and bottom-right of the fill-in boxes help children identify the parts of the names of numbers larger than twelve (e.g., 4...1 for "forty-one"). For numbers in the teens and twenties, arrows indicate the right order for saying the parts in the name.

Many might not realize that there are three different ways of naming the numbers between 0 and 100. The names for numbers/numerals 11 ("eleven") and 12 ("twelve") follow the same pattern as for numbers 0 through 10. The names for numbers/numerals 13 through 19 follow a pattern that is different from that of larger and smaller numbers. Their names reverse the more common order (e.g., "fourteen" for 1...4, which sounds similar to "forty-one").

Print and laminate the worksheets for long-term use. The worksheets will keep early learners occupied filling in the right numerals for more than a half-hour. With space for numerals up to 109, children will be learning three-place numerals before they know it.

One kindergarten teacher thought it would make it "easier for kids to understand" numerals, comparing the Flying Carpet 100 Chart to "a graph or a growing pattern."
Total Pages
3
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
30 Minutes

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The Flying Carpet 100 Chart ******* Not Your Standard 100 Chart
The Flying Carpet 100 Chart ******* Not Your Standard 100 Chart
The Flying Carpet 100 Chart ******* Not Your Standard 100 Chart