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The Great Gatsby Bundle

Common Core Standards
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2.22 MB   |   33 pages

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This Gatsby bundle combines some of our most popular items and best sellers. Sold separately, the products would be $16. We have bundled them together for a value price of $9.99.

*Practice with the Synthesis- The Great Gatsby
*Practice with the Argument- The Great Gatsby Debate
*Practice with the Argument- Tone Analysis Prompt for The Great Gatsby
*Practice with Argument- The Great Gatsby and Chris Hedges on the Rich 1%

Here are abbreviated versions of the product descriptions.

-Practice with the Synthesis- The Great Gatsby
Using an awareness of this evidence, students should be able to compose a timed-write essay in which they take a position and support it with numerous examples of correctly cited evidence. Add a rigorous and engaging synthesis opportunity to the teaching of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic novel.

-Practice with the Argument: The Great Gatsby Debate
Teens love to argue, right? Give them an engaging and content-based opportunity to express their point of view using text-based evidence by staging a debate in conjunction with the novel, The Great Gatsby. The lesson contains the directions to stage two 15 minute team cross-examination debates, Common Core Standards, Essential and Key Questions, resources, procedures, protocol, rubrics, and resource links.

-Practice with the Argument- Tone Analysis Prompt for The Great Gatsby
This lesson asks students to perform a close read of chapter 3 of The Great Gatsby, annotate the first ten paragraphs and then write an essay that examines how Fitzgerald uses tone and other rhetorical devices to achieve his purpose.

-Practice with Argument: The Great Gatsby and Chris Hedges on the Rich 1%
Chris Hedges, an uncompromising writer in the tradition of George Orwell wrote a critique on the rich 1% of the nation and praises F. Scott’s Fitzgerald assessment of the rich in The Great Gatsby. This resource has a link to Hedges’ article originally publish on Truthdig.org. There is also a video link with Hedges discussing these ideas to assist students in understanding his argument. The resource also includes links to The New York Times series Room for Debate on “Why We Like to Watch Rich People” where students have an opportunity to write a synthesis essay.

Tags: American Literature, analysis, AP English Language and Composition, argument, theme, Common Core, critical thinking, debate, economics, F. Scott Fitzgerald, film study, The Gilded Age, Great Gatsby, imagery, informational text, Modernism, non-fiction, project-based instruction, public speaking, rhetoric, rhetorical appeals, seminal American text, social justice, synthesis, tone analysis
Total Pages
33
Answer Key
Does Not Apply
Teaching Duration
2 Weeks

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The Great Gatsby Bundle
The Great Gatsby Bundle
The Great Gatsby Bundle
The Great Gatsby Bundle