The Medical Toll of WWI: The Physical & Psychological Injuries of WWI Soldiers

The Medical Toll of WWI: The Physical & Psychological Injuries of WWI Soldiers
The Medical Toll of WWI: The Physical & Psychological Injuries of WWI Soldiers
The Medical Toll of WWI: The Physical & Psychological Injuries of WWI Soldiers
The Medical Toll of WWI: The Physical & Psychological Injuries of WWI Soldiers
The Medical Toll of WWI: The Physical & Psychological Injuries of WWI Soldiers
The Medical Toll of WWI: The Physical & Psychological Injuries of WWI Soldiers
The Medical Toll of WWI: The Physical & Psychological Injuries of WWI Soldiers
The Medical Toll of WWI: The Physical & Psychological Injuries of WWI Soldiers
Product Rating
4.0
1 Rating
File Type

PDF (Acrobat) Document File

Be sure that you have an application to open this file type before downloading and/or purchasing.

1 MB|14 pages
Share
Product Description
In reflecting upon WWI, the famous philosopher George Santayana once said, "Only the dead have seen the end of war." Indeed, many American Doughboys, British Tommies, and other soldiers who survived "The Great War" would continue to live with the physical and psychological effects of that conflict for decades to come. With this lesson, students will examine how WWI resulted in horrific injuries that challenged both combatants and medical professionals.

In this lesson students will:

1) Start with a Bell Ringer that has them brainstorming reasons why warfare is often unpopular.
2) Analyze a historic photo depicting the soggy, filthy conditions of trenches and watching a video clip about trenchfoot and the medical challenge it presented.
3) Analyze a historic photo showing soldiers wearing odd looking gas masks and subsequently read a primary source account of a soldier surviving a mustard gas attack.
4) Analyze a historic photo displaying a bomb blasting right in front of a trench and, in turn, watch a video clip about traumatic facial injuries sustained by soldiers and read an article about the prevalence of shell shock in WWI.
5) Finish with an exit ticket that has them evaluating which medical issue (trenchfoot, gas poisoning, traumatic facial injury, or shell shock) would have been the worst to endure as a WWI veteran.

Extend the lesson resources included!
Total Pages
14 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
90 minutes
Report this Resource
Loading...
$3.50
Digital Download
Teachers Pay Teachers

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

Learn More

Keep in Touch!

Sign Up