The Odyssey, Review Activity for Homer’s Epic Poem, Does Odysseus Have PTSD?

Laura Randazzo
55.8k Followers
Grade Levels
9th - 12th, Homeschool
Standards
Resource Type
Formats Included
  • PDF
  • Multimedia
Pages
3-page PDF with link to video
$1.50
$1.50
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Laura Randazzo
55.8k Followers

Description

Use this lesson near the conclusion of your study of The Odyssey to help students not only dig back into the text, but also understand the real-life struggles that soldiers face as they return to civilian life. This 45-minute activity will introduce students to the criteria that psychiatrists use in diagnosing patients with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and then guide them to apply that information to a close analysis of Odysseus, king of Ithaca/Ithaka.

This activity will work with any translation (abridged or full-text) of Homer's epic poem that you use in your classroom.

Product includes:

• A detailed, step-by-step lesson procedure sheet (1-page PDF)

• Short video clip that provides an overview of PTSD symptoms (link included)

• Realistic-looking mental health form to be completed by your class of newly trained psychiatrists (1-page PDF)

• Completed key with suggested answers (1-page PDF)

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Clipboard image credit: Pixabay, Public domain
Odysseus image credit: Jastrow, WikiMedia Commons, Public domain

Total Pages
3-page PDF with link to video
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
45 minutes
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

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