"The Pedestrian" By Ray Bradbury Film Analysis

"The Pedestrian" By Ray Bradbury Film Analysis
"The Pedestrian" By Ray Bradbury Film Analysis
"The Pedestrian" By Ray Bradbury Film Analysis
"The Pedestrian" By Ray Bradbury Film Analysis
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Greetings fellow teachers! Ray Bradbury is one of my favorite authors and I feel so lucky that I get to teach him to my students.
This lesson is on Bradbury’s very short story, “The Pedestrian.” This lesson can be used as a stand-alone lesson on the short story or it can be used in conjunction with teaching Bradbury’s most famous work, Fahrenheit 451. When I teach “The Pedestrian” with Fahrenheit 451, I teach it at the end of Part 1 “The Hearth and the Salamander.” Many times my students draw connections between the two stories, as the world of Leonard Mead and Guy Montag seem to be one in the same. My students often draw the conclusion that Clarisse McLean’s uncle in Fahrenheit 451 actually is Leonard Mead in “The Pedestrian”, as Clarisse mentions to Montag that her uncle was once arrested for being a pedestrian.
Regardless of whether or not you teach this story in conjunction with Fahrenheit 451 or on its own, I found that the students watching and analyzing the TV episode from Ray Bradbury Theater really helps them to better understand the short story and the world it depicts. While this is a great dystopian story, because it is so short it can sometimes be confusing and difficult to envision the world Bradbury portrays.
Comparing and contrasting film and print is an important Common Core skill, and this lesson allows students to analyze how the changes in the film medium effect the theme of the original story and evaluate whether the theme is enhanced or lessened by the use of additional scenes and characters.
The first work sheet asks students to judge the additional character of Stockwell in the film version and how his words and/or actions effect the theme of the original story. The graphic organizer should be filled out as they watch the film version and after they have read the story
The second worksheet allows students to evaluate Bradbury’s decision of including Stockwell in the film and which version conveys the theme best in the form of a written response.

Created By: Mad Musings of an English Teacher
Total Pages
7
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
45 Minutes

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"The Pedestrian" By Ray Bradbury Film Analysis
"The Pedestrian" By Ray Bradbury Film Analysis
"The Pedestrian" By Ray Bradbury Film Analysis
"The Pedestrian" By Ray Bradbury Film Analysis