The Roaring 20s - Prohibition

The Roaring 20s - Prohibition
The Roaring 20s - Prohibition
The Roaring 20s - Prohibition
The Roaring 20s - Prohibition
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This is a 18 slide, highly animated, power point presentations on The Roaring 20s - Prohibition. Each of the presentation slides are editable so you can change it to fit your individual needs.

The ratification of the 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution banned the manufacture, transportation and sale of intoxicating liquors and ushered in a period in American history known as Prohibition. The result of a widespread temperance movement during the first decade of the 20th century, Prohibition was difficult to enforce, despite the passage of companion legislation known as the Volstead Act. At 12 A.M. on January 16, 1920, the federal Volstead Act closed every tavern, bar and saloon in the United States. From then on, it was illegal to sell any “intoxication beverages” with more than 0.5% alcohol.

Prohibitionists anticipated that Prohibition would alleviate social problems and bolster the economy. Drinking was a symbol of all they disliked about the modern city, and eliminating alcohol would, they believed, turn back the clock to an earlier and more comfortable time.

Many people disliked the law. It simply drove the liquor trade underground. People simply went to nominally illegal speakeasies instead of ordinary bars. Gangsters took control of bootlegging and violent lawlessness erupted. Organized crime figures such as Chicago gangster Al Capone, ruled Chicago. Capone reportedly had 1,000 gunmen and half of Chicago’s police force on his payroll.

Lacking public support, the federal government was virtually unable to enforce Prohibition. With the country mired in the Great Depression by 1932, creating jobs and revenue by legalizing the liquor industry had an undeniable appeal. Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt ran for president that year on a platform calling for Prohibition’s repeal, and easily won victory over the incumbent President Herbert Hoover.

FDR’s victory meant the end for Prohibition, and in February 1933 Congress adopted a resolution proposing a 21st Amendment to the Constitution that would repeal the 18th Amendment.

The presentation covers the following:

Introduction
The Volstead Act
18th Amendment
18th Amendment Ratification
Origins
Waning Support
Temperance Movements
Factory Owners
Passage of
the Amendment
The Volstead Act
Enforcement
People Still Drank!
The Criminal Element
Rise of Gangsters
End of Prohibition
Great Depression
21st Amendment
End of Presentation

This is one of many power point presentations I offer in my store under the heading.... The Roaring 20s.
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20 slides
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The Roaring 20s - Prohibition
The Roaring 20s - Prohibition
The Roaring 20s - Prohibition
The Roaring 20s - Prohibition
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