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Thinking About "Somebody Loves You, Mr. Hatch"

Emily Hutchison
3.8k Followers
Grade Levels
1st - 3rd
Subjects
Standards
Resource Type
Formats Included
  • PDF
Pages
16 pages
$3.00
$3.00
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Emily Hutchison
3.8k Followers

Description

This unit includes activities for before, during, and after the reading of "Somebody Loves You, Mr. Hatch." The main purpose of these activities is to help our students to grasp how Mr. Hatch changes and the actions that prompt such change. Metacognition or thinking about your thinking, is another component that is hit within this unit. This is a skill that is hard to visualize; therefore, speech bubbles are used to help students “see” the thinking that they are doing. Each page has “thinking” in the title to help the students realize that this book prompts them to think about the character, connections they may have, and how they may create change through their actions.
The following sheets are included:
Thinking About Giving (before reading)
Thinking About Reading
Thinking About Mr. Hatch
Thinking About Change
Thinking About Traits
Thinking About Illustrations
Thinking About Giving (after reading)

Hope your students enjoy this great book!
Emily Hutchison
Total Pages
16 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
1 Week
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting).
Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.
Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.
Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.

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