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To Kill a Mockingbird Nonfiction Reading Activity: FDR Inauguration Speech

Tracee Orman
35k Followers
Grade Levels
8th - 11th, Homeschool
Standards
Formats Included
  • Zip
Pages
6 pages
$3.00
$3.00
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Tracee Orman
35k Followers

Description

To Kill a Mockingbird Nonfiction Reading Activity: FDR Inauguration Speech

Incorporate nonfiction into your To Kill a Mockingbird unit with this activity for reading and listening to Franklin Delano Roosevelt's 1933 Inauguration Speech (his first inauguration speech).

Students will answer questions about the speech, making connections to the novel.

Teacher's guide & answer key included.

YES! You may share this electronically with your students! Great for a 1:1 or paperless school!

Other To Kill a Mockingbird resources:
All of Tracee's To Kill a Mockingbird resources
To Kill a Mockingbird Teaching Unit
To Kill a Mockingbird Common Core Discussion Questions
Teacher's Guided Notes for Each Chapter

Created by Tracee Orman
Mrs. Orman's Classroom
Total Pages
6 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
45 minutes
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).
Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.

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