Touching Visual: Appropriate Physical Contact/Reduce Violence(Autism, Aspergers)

Touching Visual: Appropriate Physical Contact/Reduce Violence(Autism, Aspergers)
Touching Visual: Appropriate Physical Contact/Reduce Violence(Autism, Aspergers)
Touching Visual: Appropriate Physical Contact/Reduce Violence(Autism, Aspergers)
Touching Visual: Appropriate Physical Contact/Reduce Violence(Autism, Aspergers)
Touching Visual: Appropriate Physical Contact/Reduce Violence(Autism, Aspergers)
Touching Visual: Appropriate Physical Contact/Reduce Violence(Autism, Aspergers)
Touching Visual: Appropriate Physical Contact/Reduce Violence(Autism, Aspergers)
Touching Visual: Appropriate Physical Contact/Reduce Violence(Autism, Aspergers)
Grade Levels
Resource Type
Common Core Standards
Product Rating
3.8
7 ratings
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428 KB|4 pages
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Product Description

Touching Visual: Appropriate Physical Contact/Reduce Violence
Autism, Aspergers, and Emotional Disorder


Visuals are a great way to help all learners grow. Some students require extra instruction in proper touching including keeping their hands to themselves, proper high-5s, and understanding that force causes injures. This tool is effective for both general education students and students with learning disabilities including autism. I find these leveled monitoring systems are more effective than social stories.

Practicing mock situations and teaching the tool is important and will allow the student to respond more appropriately when an actual physically aggressive situation occurs. Video modeling accompanies this activity nicely; I also encourage video recording a student during a altercation so they can visually see how their behavior looks to others.

This visual monitor is color coded in green, yellow, and red to correlate to a stop light’s monitoring system. Print either the different charts and use the one most appropriate for your student’s level. I use the small one for students to keep at their work areas, in their folders or even wear on a lanyard around the neck while the larger ones are used for small or whole group discussions. Glue the printed chart on construction paper or cardstock. Laminate and cut out. Use the supplied arrow and tape it to a clothespin. This allows the teacher to move the arrow to the appropriate volume category. If a clothespin is to cumbersome, use a paperclip to easily move around.

I highly recommend that this tool be used in a discussion format with the teacher and student talking through the issues. Then after teaching moments, the tool can be used in real situations to help the student monitor his or her behavior.

Like this item? Buy it in a bundle to get this and 18 other visual monitors by clicking here: Autism Visual Monitor Mega Bundle: Teach Appropriate Behavior.

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Total Pages
4 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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