Traits and Probability: Modeling Mendelian Inheritance

Traits and Probability: Modeling Mendelian Inheritance
Traits and Probability: Modeling Mendelian Inheritance
Traits and Probability: Modeling Mendelian Inheritance
Traits and Probability: Modeling Mendelian Inheritance
Traits and Probability: Modeling Mendelian Inheritance
Traits and Probability: Modeling Mendelian Inheritance
Traits and Probability: Modeling Mendelian Inheritance
Traits and Probability: Modeling Mendelian Inheritance
Grade Levels
Product Rating
File Type

Compressed Zip File

Be sure that you have an application to open this file type before downloading and/or purchasing.

13 MB|18 pages
Share
Product Description
The zip file contains a pdf and a Word document you can customize to suit your needs.

Take on the role of Gregor Mendel as he cross-pollinated pea plants to reveal patterns of inheritance.

This lesson is meant to model the pattern of Mendelian Inheritance, traits controlled by single genes with two alleles. Students use bags, representing parents, filled with beads, representing alleles, to model random selection of alleles that can be passed from parent to offspring.

The lesson is split into three activities.
1. Model breeding of a purebred parent generation.
2. Model cross-breeding of a purebred parents to produce an F1 generation.
3. Model breeding of the F1 generation to produce an F2 generation.

The first two activities are short and are meant to demonstrate that 1) Plants that are purebred for a specific trait will always yield offspring with the same trait and in 2) that when two purebred plants are crossbred the dominant form of the trait will be expressed and the recessive form will be masked in the offspring and that these offspring are what Mendel called hybrids, which we now call heterozygous.

The third activity demonstrates the outcomes that occur when the hybrid F1 generation is allowed to breed and produce the F2 generation. In the third activity, students should find that the recessive form of the trait reappears in the population and that the ratio of dominant trait to recessive trait is approximately 3 to 1 or 75% to 25%. From these results, students may be able to develop a model, diagram, or something like a Punnett Square that can be used to represent these results and predict the outcomes of other genetic crosses.

Can be used in conjunction with my other Genetics activities - Flipping Out, Mendel's Work Webquest, Rolling Dice, and Can You Roll Your Tongue?.

Please provide a review with feedback. I'm always looking for ways to improve activities.
Total Pages
18 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
3 hours
Report this Resource
Loading...
$10.00
Digital Download
More products from The Heterozygoat - A STEM Shop
Product Thumbnail
Product Thumbnail
Product Thumbnail
Product Thumbnail
Product Thumbnail
Teachers Pay Teachers

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials.

Learn More

Keep in Touch!

Sign Up