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Turn Your Math Class into a Math Learning Restaurant! Data Entrée Table Signs

Turn Your Math Class into a Math Learning Restaurant! Data Entrée Table Signs
Turn Your Math Class into a Math Learning Restaurant! Data Entrée Table Signs
Turn Your Math Class into a Math Learning Restaurant! Data Entrée Table Signs
Turn Your Math Class into a Math Learning Restaurant! Data Entrée Table Signs
Turn Your Math Class into a Math Learning Restaurant! Data Entrée Table Signs
Turn Your Math Class into a Math Learning Restaurant! Data Entrée Table Signs
Turn Your Math Class into a Math Learning Restaurant! Data Entrée Table Signs
Turn Your Math Class into a Math Learning Restaurant! Data Entrée Table Signs
Product Description
Turning Your Classroom into a Highly Effective Learning Restaurant

Classroom Restaurant

Math Menu
This week’s special: Data

With Marzano’s Effective Educator
checklists for both teacher and student;

Element 6: Identifying Critical Content.

Engage your students for learning by turning their classroom into a restaurant;

Where we feed our thoughts and dreams instead of letting them starve.

Each table has a specific learning purpose that helps focus the teacher and student on what is the learning goal of the table they are currently sitting.

This allows you to scaffold the learning:

On day 1 everyone starts at Table 1: Collect Data, where the entrée, or main
course, is being able to collect data in a survey and record that data in a tally chart.

Now you have the opportunity to track student learning throughout the unit.

For those accomplishing the learning goal at Table 1, they move on to
Table 2.

For those students not accomplishing the learning goal, they stay at Table 1 until they do.

This unit on Data has six “tables” of learning with different entrées, or learning goals, with the goal of having students reach Table 6 by the end of the unit.

For students not at Table 6 you know exactly where they are by the “table” where they are sitting, and you know what specific part of the lesson they are not successfully “digesting” the entrée, or learning goal.


Highly effective for teacher observations for tracking student progress (Marzano’s Effective Educators Element 2)

Can be used year-after-year

Materials:
*No prep needed. Everything is done for you and ready to go. Just print off table signs and place them at the tables you’ve organized for that day.

For close activity exit slips please visit my store.
Table 1 and 2 have already been done. I am working on the others.

Table 1: Collect Data: Entrée ~ Collect data in a survey and record that data in a tally chart.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Use-Survey-2-Collect-DataMini-Book-Close-Activity-Exit-Slip-Marzano-Strategies-2871325


Table 2: Read Picture Graphs: Entrée ~ Interpret data in picture graphs and use that information to solve problems.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Picture-Graph-Interpret-Data-Explain-how-Images-Clarify-Text-Use-Text-Features-2876290


Lesson Objectives:
Math: Interpret data in picture graphs and use that information to solve problems. (2.MD.4.10)

Aligned with Math Common Core standard 2.MD.4.10
~Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up to four categories.
~Solve simple put-together, take-apart, and compare problems using information presented in a bar graph.

Aligned with Go Math!
~Chapter 10 ~ Data
~Lessons 10.1 ~ 10.6
~Learning Goal: Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up to four categories. Solve simple put-together, take-apart, and compare problems using information presented in a bar graph.
~Domain: Measurement and Data ~ Represent and Interpret Data (2.MD)
~Mathematical Practices: K12.MP.4.1Model with mathematics / K12.MP.6.1Attend to precision

Marzano’s Effective Educators
Domain 1: Classroom Strategies and Behaviors

Protocol: Lesson Segment Addressing Content

Design Question 2: Helping Students Interact with New Knowledge

Element 6: Identifying Critical Content

Strategy 2: Visual Activities ~ The teacher uses pictures (signs) to highlight critical information.

Strategy 3: Tone of Voice ~ The teacher raises or lowers his or her voice to signal critical information at the table the student is currently sitting and create suspense about upcoming information by pointing out the next table for him or her to reach.

Gestures, and Body Position ~ The teacher might also communicate excitement about the information by making eye contact with students, using hand gestures, moving around the room from one table to another, and smiling (or using other appropriate facial expressions).

Strategy 4: Pause Time ~ The teacher pauses at key points during the presentation of new content to give students time to think about information and signal that it is important.


Teacher Checklist for Element 6
Identifying Critical Content

Focus Statement: The teacher continuously identifies accurate critical content during a lesson or part of a lesson that portrays a clear progression of information that leads to deeper understanding of the content.

Technology links: Use presentation software (this PDF file) to create visual displays that highlight critical information.

Example Teacher Evidences:
1. Teacher highlights critical content that portrays a clear progression of information related to standards or goals. ~ Table signs show a clear progression of learning goals throughout the unit.

2. Teacher identifies differences between the critical and non-critical content ~ The Teacher continuously calls students’ attention to accurate critical content ~ Critical academic vocabulary is used again and again with each reference to the table signs.

3. Teacher integrates cross-curricular connections to critical content ~ Teacher asks students or points out to them how specific images (e.g., a chart showing data collected) contribute to and clarify this text. (Reading learning goal 2.RI.3.7)


Student Checklist for Element 6
Identifying Critical Content

Desired Effect: Students know what content is important and what is not important.

Example Student Evidence:
1. Students can describe the level of importance of the critical content addressed in class ~ When asked students can tell you why they are sitting at their table.

2. Students can identify the critical content addressed in class ~ When asked students can point to and reference their table sign.

3. Students can explain the difference between critical and non-critical content ~ When asked students can tell you what information in the lesson relates to and supports the table learning goal and what information does not.

4. Formative data show students attend to the critical content (e.g., questioning, artifacts) ~ Students can successfully “digest” the table “entrée” and are ready to move to the next table. (student questioning)

5. Students can explain the progression of critical content ~ When asked students can explain why each table has a different “entrée” and how Table 1 leads to Table 2, and so on.

Total Pages
13 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
N/A
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