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Twelve Angry Men eNotes Lesson Plan

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410 KB|43 pages
Product Description
This is a 43 page lesson plan for Twelve Angry Men written, tested, and approved by working classroom teachers. The main components of this plan are the following:

-An in-depth introductory lecture
-Discussion questions
-Vocabulary lists
-Chapter-by-chapter study questions
-A multiple-choice test
-Essay questions

The plan is divided into a teacher and a student edition. The teacher edition provides complete answer keys.

Excerpt from introductory lecture:

"A dramatic two-act play originally written for live television in 1954, Reginald Rose’s Twelve Angry Men takes us into the jury room as twelve men deliberate to reach a verdict in a capital murder trial. Through the tense and often combative proceedings inside the room, the characters of the jury members are revealed and disturbing questions about the American system of justice are raised. The defendant is a sixteen-year-old boy accused of killing his father. Although the boy’s race is never identified explicitly, it is clear that he is a member of a racial minority. Initially, the jury quickly votes, almost unanimously, that he is guilty. A single juror, however, is not convinced of the boy’s guilt; moreover, he is deeply troubled by the others’ rush to judgment. Calmly pointing out the various questions he feels were not satisfactorily resolved during the trial, he motivates members of the jury to meet their responsibilities by actually examining the evidence offered to convict the defendant. As the men discuss the evidence, their various prejudices and internal conflicts are exposed, and we see that supposedly objective facts are often colored by personal attitudes and experiences. Gradually, one by one, members of the jury change their votes as they consider the evidence. Finally, even the most adamant among them concedes that the boy’s guilt has not been proved beyond reasonable doubt. The jury’s final verdict—not guilty—represents the triumph of justice over the injustice that results in the American legal system when citizens do not protect the principles upon which it is founded."
Total Pages
43
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A
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$15.99
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