US GEOGRAPHY/GROWTH OF INDUSTRY (Lessons 61-70/100) American History Curriculum

US GEOGRAPHY/GROWTH OF INDUSTRY (Lessons 61-70/100) American History Curriculum
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Supplement the textbook and eliminate prep time with these 10 ready-to-use reproducible American history lessons covering U.S. geography, the growth of industry, immigration, and more.

Your 5th or 6th graders will enjoy a wide variety of high-interest activities for individuals, small groups, or the entire class. Among other fun things to do, students will learn about U.S. geography while competing in contests, doing a map exercise, and playing a class game!

Most lessons have four or five activity sheets and can be finished in one or two class periods. Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key provided for each lesson. A majority of the lessons include a 20-question follow-up quiz. The quizzes can also be given as homework assignments or review exercises. Most of the information-filled lessons are able to be used without a textbook.

LESSON/ACTIVITY TITLES (61-70 of 100)
61. Geography of the United States
62. States, Cities, and Waterways
63. The Growth of Industry
64. Inventions
65. Big Business
66. The Business Cycle
67. Immigration
68. The Growth of Cities
69. The Farmers
70. Independent Study Guide

Detailed descriptions of these lessons are provided below.


LESSON 61. Geography of the United States

OBJECTIVE:
To locate states, cities, waterways, and land regions of the United States.

TIME:
1 and 1/2 class periods

This lesson is exciting, challenging, and fun!

It includes three 10-minute Contests and a Map Exercise. These activities help students become familiar with the locations of states, cities, waterways, and landforms, as well as learn geographic terms.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 62. States, Cities, and Waterways

OBJECTIVE:
To review the locations of states, cities, and waterways of the United States.

TIME:
1 and 1/2 class periods

The class is divided into two teams. Each team will try to identify the states, cities, and waterways on the map on page 62C.

Numbers on the map represent states. Letters represent cities and waterways. The game begins when the teacher announces a number or a number and letter –– 1b, 2a, and so on. The first person in class to raise their hand is called on. If they correctly identify the state, city, or waterway, their team scores 10 points. If they are incorrect, or do not respond immediately when called upon, a person from the other team can answer and score 10 points. But if they also fail to identify the state, city, or waterway, the teacher will announce it.

When a correct answer is given, students should write the place name in the appropriate space on the answer sheet.

Class members may not use a textbook, an atlas, or any other reference source during the game.

Full Game Rules are provided on the lesson pages.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 63. The Growth of Industry

OBJECTIVE:
To understand how the United States became one of the leading industrialized nations of the world.

TIME:
1 class period

The United States experienced rapid industrial growth between 1860 and 1900. Class members will begin by reading sentences that give information about the development of the United States into a leading industrial nation, and then fill in spaces with words that best complete the statements.

The lesson continues with a fun Map Exercise to show industrial regions of the United States, a natural resources Word Search puzzle, and a variety of Graph Exercises. The graphs help students learn about the U.S. population, population shifts, immigration trends, number of manufacturing jobs, tariff rates, and increases in the miles of railroad track during this period in American history.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 64. Inventions

OBJECTIVE:
To examine the role inventors played in the development of the United States into the world's leading industrialized nation.

TIME:
1 class period

This lesson begins with a unique Contest. Fifteen American inventors are listed in column one. Some names are familiar, but most are not. Their inventions, however, are all well known, with many found around the house. Each person's invention is given in column two in Morse Code, which was devised by Samuel Morse in order to send messages over a wire with his newly invented telegraph. Class members will use a key to help them decode the fifteen inventions based on a series of “dots” and “dashes” to form letters and words. Winners of the contest will be the people who fill in the most correct answers in column three within 15 minutes.

Students will next read a section entitled Great American Inventors that includes several primary sources pertaining to Thomas A. Edison, Henry Ford, and the Wright Brothers.

To conclude the lesson, class members will take part in an enjoyable activity where they pretend to be an inventor. This requires some imagination and sketching skills.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 65. Big Business

OBJECTIVE:
To assess the impact of the expansion of business and industry on the people of the United States.

TIME:
1 and 1/2 class periods

Students begin by reading a short overview about the growth of business and industry. This is followed by a series of 30 statements that students must decide are advantages or disadvantages of big business.

Next, in a section entitled Solving the Problems Created by Big Business, class members pretend to be the President and will write a State of the Union Address suggesting legislation that would solve problems facing the country in 1890. A list of eight issues is provided for students to base their speeches on. (EXAMPLE: "Factory owners demand that their workers be on the job for 12 hours a day, 6 days a week") You can give a few students a chance to read their State of the Union Address to the class.

The lesson ends with a section entitled Businesses Discover New Ways to Sell Their Products. After reading background information about different types of stores (specialty, department, chain, etc.), students must then provide an example of a modern-day business in their area that fits into each category.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 66. The Business Cycle

OBJECTIVE:
To show the booms, panics, depressions, and recessions which characterized the American economy during the one hundred year period following the Civil War.

TIME:
30 minutes

Begin by reading with the class the background information discussing how events of the Second Industrial Revolution caused millions of workers to be affected by what economists call the "business cycle." Definitions of a boom, panic, depression, and recession are also included.

Students will then learn about booms, panics, depressions, and recessions by interpreting and constructing graphs pertaining to the 100-year period following the Civil War.

The lesson concludes with follow-up questions based on the graphs.

Teacher Instructions and answer key included.


LESSON 67. Immigration

OBJECTIVE:
To assess the impact of immigration on the history and development of the United States.

TIME:
1 class period

This lesson begins with a fun Contest in which students must complete 35 sentences with the appropriate words, names, and terms from a list. These statements cover things such as why people migrated to the United States, where they came from, and how immigration affected the growing country. Later in the period, have students exchange papers. Read the answers, then determine which class members have won the contest.

Following the Contest, students construct a circle graph using figures from the first census in 1790. It shows the various nationalities that made up the population of the United States at that time. There are also true/false follow-up questions.

Next, class members will shade in a bar graph to show the number of immigrants who came to the United States during each 10-year period from 1820 to 1959. They will also print historical events on the graph. Students learn how historical events, economic conditions, and laws passed by Congress have affected the number of immigrants coming to the United States. After completing the bar graph, there are additional true/false questions.

The lesson concludes with a Map Exercise that illustrates where large numbers of immigrants came from, and which parts of the United States they settled in. Class members will also write the names of famous immigrants, the countries they came from, and the contributions they made to America on the map. This is followed by a Thought Question pertaining to the lines of poetry on the Statue of Liberty to help students develop critical thinking skills.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 68. The Growth of Cities

OBJECTIVE:
To understand the reasons for and effect of the urban revolution of the late 1800s and early 1900s.

TIME:
2 class periods

Begin by reading with the class the introductory paragraphs about the rapid population growth in American cities in the late 1800s. Students will then work individually on sections entitled:

• The Ten Largest Cities (1850-1910)
• Immigrant and Black Population of Major Cities in 1910
• Cities Grow at Strategic Locations
• A City of the 1880s

Class members will answer questions in a variety of formats throughout these sections, some of which require using information from charts. You can go over the answers later in the period.

Near the end of the class, or at the beginning of the next period, you can read with the students a section entitled The Tenements of New York. This includes a primary source account by newspaper reporter, Jacob Riis, talking about the rundown tenement district of the city. After reading the primary source, students do a writing assignment of 50-75 words describing the most unbearable conditions for residents living in the slums of New York City in the late 1800s. You can have a few volunteers read their stories to the class.

The lesson concludes with a fun Contest that lists groups of large cities found in the United States today. There are 50 groups altogether, with 4 cities in each group. Class members must determine the name of the state where the four cities are located.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 69. The Farmers

OBJECTIVE:
To understand the plight of American farmers during the years following the Civil War.

TIME:
1 class period

This lesson begins with a fun game during which the class is divided into two teams that will score points by filling in answers on the crossword puzzle on page 69C.

Play begins when Team 1 reads the first sentence in a section entitled Farms Before the Civil War and tries to identify the missing word, name, or term. Students will notice that “35 down” is in parentheses following the blank space. A look at “35 down” on the puzzle tells them the answer has 4 letters. If Team 1 can give the correct answer, it scores 40 points –– 10 for each letter. Team 2 then takes sentence 2 in this section (“16 down” on the puzzle). If Team 1 had failed to give the right answer, then Team 2 would try to identify the missing word, name, or term in sentence 1. If Team 2 knows the answer, it gets the 40 points. The game would then continue with Team 1 taking sentence 2 below.

If both teams fail to give the correct answer, then the teacher will announce it.

When a team gives the correct word, name, or term, it always scores 10 points for each letter in the answer. As correct answers are given, class members write them in the spaces below and also on the crossword puzzle.

Other sections include:

Farms After the Civil War
Problems Faced by Farmers
Attempts to Solve the Farmers' Problems
The Government Helps the Farmer

Conclude the game a few minutes before the end of the period. If the puzzle has not yet been completed, have the students fill in missing words, names, and terms for homework.

Following the game, there are five Thought Questions on page 69D that can be assigned for homework. These help students develop critical thinking skills.

Easy-to-follow Teacher Instructions and answer key included, along with a 20-question follow up quiz to measure student progress. The quiz can also be given as a homework assignment.


LESSON 70. Independent Study Guide

OBJECTIVE:
To study the Civil War Period and the growth and development of the United States after 1865, using a variety of assignments and reference sources.

TIME:
3 class periods

Each student will read through a list of 25 assignments on the Civil War Period that they might enjoy doing. Some of the assignments will earn the student 10 points, some are worth 15 points, and the others will earn the student 20 points each.

Class members must choose to do at least one assignment in each point category. Each student has to do enough assignments so that their points will add up to at least 100.

All assignments can be done using the textbook, encyclopedias, atlases, and almanacs.

You may want to give extra credit to those students who do more than the minimum requirement of 100 points.

My students like this lesson because they get to do what interests them the most.

Teacher Instructions are included.
Total Pages
57 pages
Answer Key
Included
Teaching Duration
N/A
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