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Utah SEEd Kindergarten Bundle

Grade Levels
K, Homeschool
Formats Included
  • Zip
Pages
401 pages
$45.00
Bundle
List Price:
$52.80
You Save:
$7.80
$45.00
Bundle
List Price:
$52.80
You Save:
$7.80
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Products in this Bundle (14)

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    Bonus

    Scope and Sequence and Suggested Schedule

    Also included in

    1. This Kindergarten Science Bundle addresses all NGSS standards for Kindergarten and covers a whole year of instruction. Save 20% on Kindergarten Science by purchasing these resources together. Includes:hands-on activitiesscience centerslesson plans worksheetsslide showsanswer keysLabs use easy to gat
      $47.40
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    Description

    Utah SEEd Kindergarten Bundle for the whole year! Covers all Utah SEEd standards for Kindergarten. You save 20% by purchasing this bundle. You save time by purchasing this from someone who understands Utah SEEd. Would you like to know more about Utah SEEd?

    Complete units include:

    • slide shows
    • worksheets
    • science center activities
    • little books for emergent readers
    • labs.

    Students will love these engaging activities for kindergarten science. You save 20% by purchasing this bundle

    These units are included in this Bundle:

    Living Things and What They Need

    Weather Activities for Kindergarten

    Sun and Shade

    Push and Pull

    Taking Care of the Environment

    Pumpkin Science Unit

    All About Chickens Kindergarten

    Rain Cloud Experiment

    Butterfly Clip Card Centers

    Center for Life Cycle of a Butterfly

    Life Cycle of a Butterfly Smoosh Book

    Plants Kindergarten

    Jelly Bean Science

    Covers all the standards for Utah SEEd Kindergarten.

    Weather is the combination of sunlight, wind, snow or rain, and temperature in a particular region at a particular time. People measure these conditions to describe and record the weather to identify patterns over time. Weather scientists forecast severe weather so that communities can prepare for and respond to these events. Sunlight warms Earth’s surface.

     Standard K.1.1 Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about local, observable weather conditions to describe patterns over time. Emphasize the students’ collection and sharing of data. Examples of data could include sunny, cloudy, windy, rainy, cold, or warm. (ESS2.D)

     Standard K.1.2 Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information on the effect of forecasted weather patterns on human behavior. Examples could include how humans respond to local forecasts of typical and severe weather such as extreme heat, high winds, flash floods, thunderstorms, or snowstorms. (ESS3.B)

    Standard K.1.3 Carry out an investigation using the five senses, to determine the effect of sunlight on different surfaces and materials. Examples could include measuring temperature, through touch or other methods, on natural and man-made materials in various locations throughout the day. (PS3.B)

    Standard K.1.4 Design a solution that will reduce the warming effect of sunlight on an area. Define the problem by asking questions and gathering information, convey designs through sketches, drawings, or physical models, and compare and test designs. (PS3.B, ETS1.A, ETS1.B, ETS1.C)

    Living things (plants and animals, including humans) depend on their surroundings to get what they need, including food, water, shelter, and a favorable temperature. The characteristics of surroundings influence where living things are naturally found. Plants and animals affect and respond to their surroundings.

    Standard K.2.1 Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to describe patterns of what living things (plants and animals, including humans) need to survive. Emphasize the similarities and differences between the survival needs of all living things. Examples could include that plants depend on air, water, minerals, and light to survive, or animals depend on plants or other animals to survive. (LS1.C)

     Standard K.2.2 Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about patterns in the relationships between the needs of different living things (plants and animals, including humans) and the places they live. Emphasize that living things need water, air, and resources and that they live in places that have the things they need. Examples could include investigating plants grown in various locations and comparing the results or comparing animals with the places they live. (LS2.B, ESS3.A)

    Standard K.2.3 Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about how living things (plants and animals, including humans) affect their surroundings to survive. Examples could include squirrels digging in the ground to hide their food, plant roots breaking concrete, or humans building shelters. (ESS2.E)

     Standard K.2.4 Design and communicate a solution to address the effects that living things (plants and animals, including humans) experience while trying to survive in their surroundings. Define the problem by asking questions and gathering information, convey designs through sketches, drawings, or physical models, and compare designs. Emphasize students working from a plant, animal, or human perspective. Examples could include a plant growing to get more sunlight, a beaver building a dam, or humans caring for the Earth by reusing and recycling natural resources. (ESS3.C, ETS1.A, ETS1.B, ETS1.C)

     Strand K.3: FORCES, MOTION, AND INTERACTIONS The motion of objects can be observed and described. Pushing or pulling on an object can change the speed or direction of an object’s motion and can start or stop it. Pushes and pulls can have different strengths and different directions. A bigger push or pull makes things go faster and when objects touch or collide, they push on one another and can change motion.

     Standard K.3.1 Plan and conduct an investigation to compare the effects of different strengths or different directions of forces on the motion of an object. Emphasize forces as a push and pull on an object. The idea of strength should be kept separate from the idea of direction. Non-contact forces, such as magnets and static electricity, will be taught in Grades 3 through 5. (PS2.A, PS2.B, PS2.C, PS3.C) Standard K.3.2 Analyze data to determine how a design solution causes a change in the speed or direction of an object with a push or a pull. Define the problem by asking questions and gathering information, convey designs through sketches, drawings, or physical models, and compare and test designs. Examples of problems requiring a solution could include having a marble or other object move a certain distance, follow a particular path, or knock down other objects. (PS2.A, PS2.B, PS2.C, PS3.C, ETS1.A, ETS1.B, ETS1.C)


    The slideshows and pages in this bundle are not editable. My work is protected and secure for copyright reasons. 

    These resources are created by Lynda R. Williams at Teaching Science
    Follow me and get news of my new resources.  Each new resource is discounted by 50% for the first 24 hours! 

    If you have questions about my resources please contact me at lywilliams1@gmail.com

    Please see my other Utah SEEd bundles:

    Utah SEEd Bundle for First Grade

    Utah SEEd Second Grade Bundle

    Total Pages
    401 pages
    Answer Key
    Included
    Teaching Duration
    1 Year
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