Volume of Regular & Irregular Prisms - task cards and printables bundle

Volume of Regular & Irregular Prisms - task cards and printables bundle
Volume of Regular & Irregular Prisms - task cards and printables bundle
Volume of Regular & Irregular Prisms - task cards and printables bundle
Volume of Regular & Irregular Prisms - task cards and printables bundle
Volume of Regular & Irregular Prisms - task cards and printables bundle
Volume of Regular & Irregular Prisms - task cards and printables bundle
Volume of Regular & Irregular Prisms - task cards and printables bundle
Volume of Regular & Irregular Prisms - task cards and printables bundle
Grade Levels
Common Core Standards
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Product Description
Build your students’ proficiency with volume of regular and irregular rectangular prisms with this comprehensive bundle of “print-and-go” resources – everything you will need to build, reinforce, and assess key fifth grade fraction concepts: reference sheets, task cards, self-checking puzzles, and assessment activities.

NOTE: This bundle contains five products available separately:

Turn Up the Volume - finding volume with cubes task cards + printables (set a)
Turn Up the Volume - volume of rectangular prisms task cards/printables (set b)
Name That Length - analyzing irregular prisms task cards + printables (set b)
Turn Up the Volume - volume of irregular prisms task cards + printables (set c)
Self-Checking Math Riddles - Volume of Rectangular Prisms and Irregular Figures

Purchasing this bundle gives you 25% savings on the cost of the individual products.

This product is a ZIP file containing five PDF s. For directions about how to “unzip” the files, TpT provides instructions here.

_______________________________________________________________________________________
Common Core State Standards for Mathematics addressed:
Measurement and Data (MD)
Geometric measurement: understand concepts of volume and relate volume to multiplication and to addition.
• Measure volumes by counting unit cubes, using cubic cm, cubic in, cubic ft, and improvised units. (5.MD.4)
• Represent threefold whole-number products as volumes, e.g., to represent the associative property of multiplication. (5.MD.5a)
• Apply the formulas V = l x w x h and V=b x h for rectangular prisms to find volumes of right rectangular prisms with whole- number edge lengths in the context of solving real world and mathematical problems. (5.MD.5b)
• Recognize volume as additive. Find volumes of solid figures composed of two non-overlapping right rectangular prisms by adding the volumes of the non-overlapping parts. (5.MD.5c)
_______________________________________________________________________________________

Included:
• 4 different graphic reference sheets
• 4 sets of 32 task cards – 128 cards in all
• task card answer sheets and keys
• 12 self-checking puzzles and keys
• 16 assessment activities and keys/scoring guides


Turn Up the Volume (set a)

This set is designed as an introduction to volume concepts. It focuses on the basics of volume instruction – counting (or using some other method) to determine the number of cubic units that make up prisms and other three-dimensional figures composed of cubes. The cards begin by presenting students with simple prisms made up of cubes, and then scale up in difficulty. The final twelve cards (cards 20 through 32) present students with irregular figures, all made up of cubes, and requires students to determine the number of cubes of which the figure is composed. The variety of question types will push your students to consider how cubes can be used to determine the volume of prisms. This set will require far more of your students than just counting cubes or adding and multiplying dimensions. They will have to reason about volume, strengthening their understanding of this key measurement concept.

Included among the printables are a graphic reference sheet illustrating key concepts that lay the foundation for a strong understanding of what volume is and how volume can be measured and two assessment activities that can be used to evaluate student understanding of using counting and calculations to determine the volume of three-dimensional figures.

Turn Up the Volume (set b)

This set of task cards & resources is a follow-up to Set A in my Turn Up the Volume! series. It focuses primarily on the application of the formula for finding volume of rectangular prisms, presenting prisms that are not divided into cubic sections, but shown whole with labeled dimensions. The majority of the numbers used for the prisms’ dimensions are single-digit numbers, with some double-digit multiples of 10 and some numbers in the teens up through 16. The size of the numbers chosen to allow the cards to be as accessible as possible to the wide range of students you likely have in your class.

The cards are organized by difficulty, and there are 8 different types of questions, with each set of 4 cards featuring one particular question type. Cards 1 through 4 feature one kind of question, cards 5 through 8 feature a different type of question, and so on. The questions build in difficulty, with each set of four cards presenting problems that are more challenging than the cards that precede them. This set will require far more of your students than just multiplying three numbers. They will have to reason about volume, strengthening their understanding of this key measurement concept.

Included among the printables are a graphic reference sheet that illustrates the relationship between the lengths of a rectangular prism’s edges and its volume, presenting the formulas V = l x w x h and V = B x h, and demonstrating how the associative property of multiplication allows for flexibility when multiplying the dimensions and two assessment activities that can be used to evaluate student understanding of volume of rectangular prisms.

Name That Length! (set b)

When students work to find the volume of three-dimensional figures that are composed of non-overlapping rectangular prisms, one of the challenges for some students is simply knowing the lengths of some of the unlabeled edges. Some students immediately pick up on the fact that opposite edges are the same length, but other students do not. Even trickier for some students is understanding that one long edge is equal to the sum of smaller edges that are opposite it. In my experience, some kids pick that up immediately, and others struggle to see it! This ability is crucial in being able to find the volume of a three-dimensional figure made up of rectangular prisms. If a student decomposes the figure into two prisms but can’t figure out one of the edge lengths, they obviously can’t figure out the volume of that section – or of the figure as a whole!

I designed this set to help give my students practice in using the properties of rectangular and rectilinear prisms to figure out the lengths of unlabeled edges. Each of the 32 cards in this set presents the students with a three-dimensional figure composed of two non-overlapping rectangular prisms. The figures have most edge lengths labeled, but two of the edges have their lengths identified with variables. The students have to use the known side lengths to figure out the unknown side lengths.

Included among the printables are a graphic reference sheet that illustrates the relationships between edge lengths on rectangular and rectilinear prisms and four assessment activities that can be used to evaluate student understanding of determining unknown edge lengths on figures composed of non-overlapping rectangular prisms.

Turn Up the Volume (set c)

This set of task cards & resources is a follow-up to earlier sets in my Turn Up the Volume! series, which focus on the volume of figures made up of cubes and the volume of rectangular prisms. This set focues on finding the volume of rectilinear figures – three-dimensional figures that are composed of non-overlapping rectangular prisms. They need to be able to partition or decompose the figure into two rectangular prisms, find the individual volumes of those prisms, and then recognize that the volume of the entire figure is the sum of the volumes of the individual sections.

These cards were designed to provided scaffolding for students and so the difficulty level increases from Card 1 through Card 32. All of the cards present students with irregular figures composed of two rectangular prisms. On Cards 1 through 16, the prisms are already partitioned in two, with each section labeled as prism A or prism B. The students are asked to find the volume of either prism A or prism B, requiring them to figure out the lengths of unlabeled or partitioned edges and then apply the volume formula. On Cards 17-24, the prisms are also already partitioned, but they are not individually labeled. The students are asked to fill-in a partially completed expression (such as V = (___ x 3 x 7) + (___ x 12 x 7)) to show how the volume of the the complete prism could be calculated. The cards in the final set of 8 (cards 25 through 32) each present a non-partitioned irregular figure and ask the students to find the volume of the complete figure.

Included among the printables are a graphic reference sheet that shows how an irregular figure like the ones on the cards can be partitioned into separate prisms in order to find the volume of the complete figure and eight assessment activities that can be used to evaluate student understanding of volume of rectilinear figures.

Self-Checking Puzzles

These twelve puzzles were designed to build students’ flexibility with volume. Each sheet features a set of prisms and irregular figures or dimensions for a set of prisms. The students are asked to find the volume of a figure or to use a given volume to find an unknown dimension. Once they do so, they take the letter that represents the unknown measurement and fills in a blank(s) to create words that make up the answer to a joke. Most of the numbers used as dimensions are single-digit numbers, with a few two-digit numbers used; none of the dimensions are larger than 15.

The first four puzzles present prisms and figures that are made up of cubes. Students are able to use counting as a strategy for these figures. The next four puzzles show the outline of rectangular prisms with dimensions labeled. For some of these, student use three given dimensions for find the unknown volume; for others, students use two given dimensions and the given volume to find the unknown dimension. The final four puzzles give descriptions of rectangular prisms, some with an unknown volume and others with one unknown dimension, and students solve using the information given in the descriptions.


For more practice with measurement concepts, please check out the other related resources I have available –

Area and Perimeter Puzzlers - task cards + printables (set B)

World Records: Filling Foods - measurement units task cards & printables (set a)

In and Around - area and perimeter task cards + printables (set C)



I hope your students enjoy these resources and are able to build their proficiency with volume.
Total Pages
104 pages
Answer Key
Included with rubric
Teaching Duration
N/A
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