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Wacky Wednesday Math Addition and Subtraction Word Problems | Google Slides

Grade Levels
K - 1st, Homeschool
Standards
Resource Type
Formats Included
  • Google Slides™
  • Internet Activities
Pages
20 Slides
$4.00
$4.00
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Made for Google Drive™
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Description

WOW! Digital addition and subtraction WACKY Word Problems! There are colorful slides for virtual or in-person teaching for kindergarten or first grade! These are great for Read Across America Week, having a Wacky Wednesday celebration, or practice with word problems.

What is in this download?

  • 20 Colorful Google Slides with Editable Text Boxes, Directions, Movable Parts, and counters to place in a ten frame.
  • 10 of the slides are ADDITION
  • 10 of the slides are SUBTRACTION (the backgrounds are NOT editable)
  • Moveable Parts for Digital Learning
  • Use Virtual or In Person

SEE Video Tutorial

FOCUS: Addition and Subtraction 1-10

Slide backgrounds CAN NOT be edited, just the text boxes and movable parts can be edited.

You can delete slides you don’t want to send to students, add your own directions or images to the sides of the slides to personalize. You can edit the problem number in the corner.

GRADES k-1st GRADE

>>>>> YOU DO NOT need Google Classroom to use Google Slides. It will force a copy of it on your Google Drive. Students do not need to have Google Classroom to participate. They will need a Google account, which does not have to be a Gmail account, but just an account with Google that gives them access to Google Drive. <<<<<<

Easily share through Google Classroom to collect information or share from your computer to Zoom or Meets. Students move counters, clipart, and edit text boxes for plenty of math and computer practice!

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Total Pages
20 Slides
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
1 Week
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Standards

to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. Mathematically proficient students notice if calculations are repeated, and look both for general methods and for shortcuts. Upper elementary students might notice when dividing 25 by 11 that they are repeating the same calculations over and over again, and conclude they have a repeating decimal. By paying attention to the calculation of slope as they repeatedly check whether points are on the line through (1, 2) with slope 3, middle school students might abstract the equation (𝑦 – 2)/(𝑥 – 1) = 3. Noticing the regularity in the way terms cancel when expanding (𝑥 – 1)(𝑥 + 1), (𝑥 – 1)(𝑥² + 𝑥 + 1), and (𝑥 – 1)(𝑥³ + 𝑥² + 𝑥 + 1) might lead them to the general formula for the sum of a geometric series. As they work to solve a problem, mathematically proficient students maintain oversight of the process, while attending to the details. They continually evaluate the reasonableness of their intermediate results.
Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).
Solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10, e.g., by using objects or drawings to represent the problem.

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