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Week of Monsters: Odysseus and the Lotos-Eaters (Poetry Activity)

Week of Monsters: Odysseus and the Lotos-Eaters (Poetry Activity)
Week of Monsters: Odysseus and the Lotos-Eaters (Poetry Activity)
Week of Monsters: Odysseus and the Lotos-Eaters (Poetry Activity)
Week of Monsters: Odysseus and the Lotos-Eaters (Poetry Activity)
Week of Monsters: Odysseus and the Lotos-Eaters (Poetry Activity)
Week of Monsters: Odysseus and the Lotos-Eaters (Poetry Activity)
Week of Monsters: Odysseus and the Lotos-Eaters (Poetry Activity)
Week of Monsters: Odysseus and the Lotos-Eaters (Poetry Activity)
Created ByFutureED
File Type
Word Document File (22 KB|4 pages)
Standards
  • Product Description
  • Standards
Part of my "Week of Odysseus's Monsters", this lesson plan is part of a weekly plan in my Odyssey unit. This awesome activity is designed for classroom environments that have access to 1:1 technology. Rent a lab. Have your students bring their laptops! Why? Because they are creating their own digital text from Lord Alfred Tennyson's "The Lotos-eaters". This makes a great activity and comes complete with examples to help your students succeed.
Log in to see state-specific standards (only available in the US).
Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 11-CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 11-CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.
Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).
Total Pages
4 pages
Answer Key
N/A
Teaching Duration
45 minutes
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